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What to know about steroids and MS

Multiple Sclerosis attacks the protective coating around the nervous system. People with the condition often experience periods of severe symptoms, or flares. The flares may become more frequent over time as the condition progresses.

Although there is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), some treatments — including steroids — can help slow the progression of the condition and reduce symptom severity during flares.

Read on to learn more about steroids for MS.

Steroids and MS


Doctors may prescribe steroids for people who experience visual disturbances and other severe symptoms during an MS flare.

A doctor may prescribe intravenous or oral steroids when a person with MS experiences a flare. However, although steroids can be effective for reducing the severity and duration of a person's symptoms during the flare, they can cause unpleasant side effects.

For this reason, a doctor may only recommend steroids when a person has a severe flare that interferes with their ability to function.

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What to know about MS in children

Multiple Sclerosis is a progressive disease that can severely damage nerves throughout the body. symptoms tend to worsen, and as the disease progresses, it can cause impaired speech and motor skills.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) can lead to significant difficulties in performing daily tasks and can greatly affect a person's quality of life.

There is no cure, and treatments focus on preventing and reducing MS symptoms.

MS is not as common in children as it is in adults. When it does develop in children, they and their parents and caregivers may feel fear and uncertainty about the disease.

Keep reading for more information about how MS affects children. We also describe symptoms and the range of treatments.

Prevalence


MS is a progressive condition that requires management of symptoms.

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What to know about surgery for MS

Multiple Sclerosis attacks the protective coating around the nerves throughout the body, including those in the brain. Multiple Sclerosis is a progressive disease, which means that it typically becomes worse over time.

As it progresses, a person often notices their movement, speech, and other bodily functions becoming impaired. Eventually, these impairments can become life-altering.

According to research that the National Multiple Sclerosis Society part funded, nearly 1 million people in the United States are living with multiple sclerosis (MS). There is no cure for MS, but treatment can reduce the severity of its symptoms.

One potential treatment that people living with MS may opt for is surgery. Below, we discuss some of the most common surgical procedures for MS as well as the advantages and risks of having surgery to treat this condition.

Rhizotomy


Surgery can reduce the severity of MS symptoms.

MS can cause severe nerve pain, which often affects the face and head. Sometimes, even mild stimulation of this area of the body can trigger pain. Rhizotomy is a surgical option that can help address facial pain.

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Can naltrexone help with multiple sclerosis (MS)?

Naltrexone, in low doses, has recently become a popular drug for treating Multiple Sclerosis. This is an off-label use, and research into its effectiveness is still underway.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that damages the nerve cells. As it progresses, symptoms can get in the way of daily life and impair movement, speech, and other bodily functions. There is no cure, but there are treatments people can use to manage the symptoms and slow down the disease progression.

Naltrexone is one emerging treatment option. Naltrexone is a drug officially approved to treat alcohol and opioid addictions. In lower doses, doctors have started using the drug to help manage MS.

In this article, we look at the current research into naltrexone, how doctors use it to treat MS symptoms, its side effects, and warnings.

What is naltrexone?


Doctors may suggest using naltrexone to treat MS.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved naltrexone for treating alcohol dependence and preventing a relapse from opioid dependence. The drug prevents people from feeling the high they associate with these substances.

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How does MS affect the eyes?

Eye problems are relatively common in people with Multiple Sclerosis and can include blurred sight, double vision, and vision loss. Multiple Sclerosis treatments can help.

As with the other symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), eye symptoms can appear during a flare and then fade away over time. Treatments may help protect a person's eyesight, slow the progress of MS, and prevent further damage.

In this article, we look at how MS can affect a person's vision and the treatment options for these symptoms.

MS and eye problems


Vision problems are a potential early sign of MS.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease in which the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy nerve cells. In doing so, it damages the protective coating of these cells, which is called the myelin sheath. Damage to these cells can cause permanent scarring in the brain, leading to a range of symptoms.

Although MS affects each person differently, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) note that vision problems are very often the first symptoms that people with MS experience.

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What to know about secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS)

Secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis is a later stage of Multiple Sclerosis. Instead of having symptom relapses and remissions, a person's symptoms steadily get worse over time.

Most people, but not everyone, with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) will eventually develop secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS). Because of advances in current treatment, fewer people go on to develop SPMS than before, and it takes longer to transition to SPMS.

In this article, we provide an overview of SPMS, including its classifications, symptoms, causes, treatments, and ways to manage symptoms.

What is SPMS?


Most people with RRMS will develop SPMS.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive condition that causes the immune system to mistakenly attacks the nerve cells in the central nervous system. The most common type of MS is RRMS, which is the stage before SPMS.

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, most people with RRMS will eventually develop a secondary progression course that involves a gradual worsening of symptoms over time.

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Medical conditions that cause muscle wasting

Muscle wasting is a loss of muscle mass due to the muscles weakening and shrinking. There are several possible causes of muscle wasting, including certain medical conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

The symptoms of muscle wasting depend on the severity of muscle mass loss, but typical signs and symptoms include:

reduced muscle strengthan impaired ability to perform physical activitiesa decrease in muscle size

Diagnosis usually occurs after a medical history review and physical examination. The cause of muscle wasting is sometimes evident. In other instances, a doctor may need to perform additional tests to confirm a diagnosis.

Medical conditions that can cause muscle wasting include the following:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis


A number of medical conditions can cause muscles to weaken.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease that affects nerve cells throughout the body.

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Can red meat reduce the risk of MS?

Scientists have found a link between consumption of a daily portion of unprocessed red meat as part of a Mediterranean diet and a reduction in brain changes that precede MS.


Should unprocessed red meat feature in the diet of those at high risk of MS?

Around 1 million adults in the United States live with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Scientists do not fully understand what causes the condition. Many believe that the body mounts an autoimmune attack on its central nervous system (CNS), damaging the protective myelin layer, which coats many neurons. The result is a diverse range of neurological symptoms.

In the U.S., the chance of developing MS is 1 in 1,000 (0.1%) for the general population. This risk is greater for those with a first-degree relative with MS and stands at 2–4%, while people with an identical twin living with MS have a 30–50% risk of developing the condition.

In some cases, changes in the brain appear years before a person notices any MS symptoms.

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Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

Discovery could inform future studies related to spinal cord injuries, Multiple Sclerosis and epilepsy

Date:Source:University of Missouri-ColumbiaSummary:Scientists have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally. If that voltage is absent, scientists say everything is 'out of whack.'

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Nerve cell illustration.

Credit: © peterschreiber.media / Adobe Stock

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Study shows promise in repairing damaged myelin

A scientific breakthrough provides new hope for millions of people living with Multiple Sclerosis. Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have developed a compound that stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

The discovery, involving mice genetically engineered to mimic Multiple Sclerosis, published in the journal JCI Insight.

MS is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 2.3 million people worldwide. In MS, the sheath covering nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord becomes damaged, slowing or blocking electrical signals from reaching the eyes, muscles and other parts of the body. This sheath is called myelin. Although myelin can regrow through exposure to thyroid hormones, researchers have not pursued thyroid hormone therapies due to unacceptable side effects.

Although several treatments and medications alleviate the symptoms of MS, there is no cure.

"There are no drugs available today that will re-myelinate the de-myelinated axons and nerve fibers, and ours does that," said senior author Tom Scanlan, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology in the OHSU School of Medicine.

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Do minerals play a role in development of multiple sclerosis?

Some studies have suggested that minerals such as zinc and iron may play a role in how Multiple Sclerosis (MS) progresses, once people have been diagnosed with it. But little was known about whether zinc, iron and other minerals play a role in the development of the disease. A new study shows no link between dietary intake of several minerals and whether people later develop MS.

The study is published in the April 3, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. This article will also be published in the April 30 print issue of Neurology which is largely dedicated to null hypothesis studies with negative or inconclusive results. These results have the potential to inform future research efforts and to save study participants from avoidable risks.

"Higher intake of vitamin D has been associated with a lower risk of MS, but our findings show that intake of minerals is not an important determinant of MS risk," said study author Marianna Cortese, MD, PhD, of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

The study involved 80,920 female nurses in the Nurses' Health Study and 94,511 in the Nurses' Health Study II. The women were asked via a questionnaire about diet and any supplement use every four years for up to 20 years of follow-up before some of the women developed MS.

The minerals studied were zinc, iron, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, manganese and copper.

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Researchers optimize aptamer with enhanced myelin-binding properties for MS treatment

Date:Source:Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering NewsSummary:A new study has demonstrated the enhanced ability of an optimized 20-nucleotide derivative of a larger DNA aptamer to bind myelin in a mouse model of Multiple Sclerosis.

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-A new study has demonstrated the enhanced ability of an optimized 20-nucleotide derivative of a larger DNA aptamer to bind myelin in a mouse model of Multiple Sclerosis. The study, which also provides the first evidence of cross-reactivity of this myelin-binding aptamer with human brain cells, is published in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text of this open access article on the Nucleic Acid Therapeutics website.

The laboratories of L. James Maher, III and Moses Rodriguez from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science (Rochester, MN) coauthored the article entitled "Optimization of a 40-mer Antimyelin DNA Aptamer Identifies a 20-mer with Enhanced Properties for Potential Multiple Sclerosis Therapy." The researchers took a 20-nucleotide region of a parental 40-nucleotide myelin-binding DNA aptamer and used a rational, non-biased approach to molecular evolution to optimize the 20-nucleotide minimal sequence for improved myelin binding. They conclude that due to its cross-reactivity with human oligodendroglioma cells in vitro, it represents a promising lead molecule for further investigation.

"The authors highlight the value of aptamer refinement of a therapeutic for Multiple Sclerosis treatment and present a novel application for cell imaging," says Executive Editor Graham C. Parker, PhD, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers T32GM065841 and F30CA220660. 

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Common treatment for multiple sclerosis may prolong life

Researchers from the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute have found that a widely prescribed drug for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is associated with longer survival for patients.

The study, published today in the journal Brain, found that people with MS who took a beta interferon drug had a 32 per cent lower mortality risk than those that did not take the drug. This was particularly evident among MS patients who took beta interferon for more than three years.

The study, which followed nearly 6,000 people with MS in Canada and France over a period of more than two decades, is the first and largest of its kind to look at mortality associated with beta interferon for the treatment of MS.

"This is a significant study," said lead author Elaine Kingwell, a research associate and epidemiologist in the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and the faculty of medicine at UBC, and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute. "Although these drugs have been prescribed since the mid-1990s, it takes time before scientists can look at the effect of these treatments on a long-term outcome like survival. We found that patients who were treated with these drugs during routine clinical practice survived longer overall than patients who had not taken beta interferon."

MS is a disease that affects the central nervous system, in which cells from the immune system attack and damage the nerve cells' protective sheath. The disease often results in disability and can have a significant impact on quality of life.

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Pediatric onset multiple sclerosis study examines baffling, often-overlooked disease

Seemingly overnight, healthy children develop mysterious, potentially disabling symptoms. When children finally receive a diagnosis, often after weeks of tests and office and hospital visits, the parents may be shocked to learn that they have Multiple Sclerosis -- a potentially disabling autoimmune disease once believed to affect only adults.

"For many years, the tagline for MS was that it was the 'leading crippler of young adults,'" said Theodore P. Cross, a senior research specialist in social work at the University of Illinois. Cross is also a co-author of a recent study on families of children with pediatric onset MS, published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma.

"Many of these kids went through a diagnostic odyssey where they would go from pediatricians to emergency rooms to other pediatricians, and it could take weeks to even get the diagnosis that they had MS," Cross said. "Meanwhile, their bodily function is off. They're suffering from fatigue. Their vision and mental processes may be affected. They have no idea why and no diagnosis to explain it."

The parents in the study were recruited from the pediatric MS centers at Boston Children's Hospital, where co-author Lisa V. Duffy practices, and Massachusetts General Hospital, where co-authors psychologist David J. Rintell and Alane K. Shanks practiced with Partners Pediatric MS Center.

According to Rintell, "The pediatric form of MS wasn't even diagnosed until perhaps a little more than a decade ago. It wasn't recognized."

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Could medical marijuana help older people with their ailments?

Medical marijuana may bring relief to older people who have symptoms like pain, sleep disorders or anxiety due to chronic conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, neuropathy, spinal cord damage and Multiple Sclerosis, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019. The study not only found medical marijuana may be safe and effective, it also found that one-third of participants reduced their use of opioids. However, the study was retrospective and relied on participants reporting whether they experienced symptom relief, so it is possible that the placebo effect may have played a role. Additional randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 80 percent of older adults have at least one chronic health condition.

"With legalization in many states, medical marijuana has become a popular treatment option among people with chronic diseases and disorders, yet there is limited research, especially in older people," said study author Laszlo Mechtler, MD, of Dent Neurologic Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology. "Our findings are promising and can help fuel further research into medical marijuana as an additional option for this group of people who often have chronic conditions."

The study involved 204 people with an average age of 81 who were enrolled in New York State's Medical Marijuana Program. Participants took various ratios of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to cannabidiol (CBD), the main active chemicals in medical marijuana, for an average of four months and had regular checkups. The medical marijuana was taken by mouth as a liquid extract tincture, capsule or in an electronic vaporizer.

Initially, 34 percent of participants had side effects from the medical marijuana. After an adjustment in dosage, only 21 percent reported side effects. The most common side effects were sleepiness in 13 percent of patients, balance problems in 7 percent and gastrointestinal disturbances in 7 percent. Three percent of the participants stopped taking the medical marijuana due to the side effects. Researchers said a ratio of one-to-one THC to CBD was the most common ratio among people who reported no side effects.

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How metabolites target brain-homing immune cells to treat multiple sclerosis

Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY. "How metabolites target brain-homing immune cells to treat Multiple Sclerosis: The discovery could lead to novel, more specific, and more effective MS therapies and a better understanding of how the disease develops." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190228093601.htm>.

Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY. (2019, February 28). How metabolites target brain-homing immune cells to treat Multiple Sclerosis: The discovery could lead to novel, more specific, and more effective MS therapies and a better understanding of how the disease develops. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 14, 2019 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190228093601.htm

Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY. "How metabolites target brain-homing immune cells to treat Multiple Sclerosis: The discovery could lead to novel, more specific, and more effective MS therapies and a better understanding of how the disease develops." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190228093601.htm (accessed June 14, 2019).

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Disability progression in multiple sclerosis linked to income, education

Neighbourhood income and education level is associated with risk of disability progression in patients with Multiple Sclerosis, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

UBC researchers, along with colleagues in Wales, compared population health data across several measures of socioeconomic status, and found that lower neighbourhood-level income and educational attainment was associated with an increased likelihood of reaching key physical disability milestones, such as difficulties with walking.

The findings -- published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology -- paint a clearer picture of the way that wealth and education might affect patients with MS.

"This study is the first of its kind," says the study's senior author Helen Tremlett, professor in the division of neurology at UBC and the Canada Research Chair in neuroepidemiology and Multiple Sclerosis. "Previous studies have looked at the relationship between socioeconomic status and risk of developing MS. Here, we were able to show a relationship between socioeconomic status and subsequent risk of disability progression."

MS is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when the body's immune system attacks myelin, the fatty material that insulates neurons to enable rapid transmission of electrical signals. When myelin or neurons are damaged, communication between the brain and other parts of the body is disrupted leading to impaired ability including vision problems, muscle weakness, difficulty with balance and coordination, and cognitive decline. Most people who live with MS will experience some form of reduced ability.

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New compound offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS

New compound offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS

Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. This debilitating condition periodically shutters communication between the brain and other parts of the body, resulting in symptoms that range from numbness and tingling in the arms and legs to blindness and paralysis. While treatments are available to alleviate inflammation, no therapies exist to protect neurons or repair the degraded myelin sheath that normally surrounds nerves.

Previous studies have shown that estrogens and estrogen-like compounds reduce Multiple Sclerosis-like inflammation and disability in mice. At first glance these treatments appear promising, but they carry a host of negative side effects, from feminizing male mice to increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke. An interdisciplinary team of scientists have piggy-backed on this approach with a new concept that side steps the negative side effects while alleviating symptoms.

In a paper published on January 24 in Scientific Reports, Seema Tiwari-Woodruff, an associate professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine at University of California, Riverside, and her colleagues detail their efforts to create new forms of the drug chloroindazole, or IndCl, a compound that acts on a subset of estrogen receptors. Their work shows that these new compounds offer the protective effects of estrogen without the unpleasant side effects.

"Multiple Sclerosis is a complicated disease with multiple disease aspects ¾ inflammation, demyelination and neuron death," said Tiwari-Woodruff, a corresponding author on the paper. "We believe we created a drug that does two things really well, modulating inflammation and allowing axon remyelination. No other drug on the market can do these two things simultaneously."

Tiwari-Woodruff turned to her colleagues at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, or UIUC, to develop the new forms, or analogues, based on the parent molecule, chloroindazole.

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Most of the information found on this website comes from RSS Feeds. It is an automated task that provides the information to you. We try to limit items that are duplicates, but with many feeds this can be difficult. Since the owner of this website also has MS and is legally blind this service was necessary to keep the website running with as much automation as possible. Volunteers help from time to time but many have disabilities themselves. We thank you for visiting us and hope that MSC can be of service to you and your loved ones.

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