8 Ways MS Is Different for Women

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered an autoimmune condition that affects the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system. The disease affects women more often than men.
According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, women may be up to three times more likely than men to get MS. The disease can also cause symptoms specific to women. But women and men share most of the same symptoms of MS.

The MS symptoms that primarily affect women seem to relate to hormone levels.
Some researchers think that having lower levels of testosterone may play a role. Others think fluctuations in female hormones may be a factor.
More research is needed to determine the true causes of these symptom differences.
The main symptoms that affect women more than men include menstrual problems, pregnancy-related symptoms, and menopause issues.

Menstrual problems

Research has shown that some women have increased MS symptoms during their periods. That may be because of a drop in estrogen levels during that time.
symptoms that worsened for study participants included weakness, imbalance, depression, and fatigue.

Pregnancy-related symptoms

Some good news for women with MS: Research has found that MS has no effect on fertility. That means that MS won’t keep you from getting pregnant and giving birth to a healthy child.
In even better news, for most women, MS symptoms actually stabilize or improve during pregnancy, especially during the second and third trimesters. However, it’s common for them to return following delivery.

Menopause

Some research has found that in some women, MS symptoms get worse after menopause. As with menstrual symptoms, this may be due to a drop in estrogen levels caused by menopause.
Studies have shown that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) helps ease these symptoms for postmenopausal women.
However, HRT has also been linked with increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, and stroke. If you have questions about whether HRT might be helpful for you in managing your MS symptoms after menopause, talk to your doctor.

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In general, MS symptoms are the same for both women and men. But the symptoms vary for everyone depending on the location and severity of nerve damage caused by inflammation.
Some of the most common MS symptoms are listed below.

Muscle symptoms    - click here to continue reading 



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Magnetically levitated plasma proteins could vastly improve diagnosis of diseases

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 5 2020

Researchers at Michigan State University's Precision Health Program have helped develop a fascinating new method for detecting the density of proteins in the blood - a method that could vastly improve the rate at which diseases are detected and diagnosed.

The method, called "magnetic levitation," or MagLev, had previously been used to separate different types of particles in solutions, arranging them in groups based on their relative densities rather than weight. Now, two new studies by Precision Health's Morteza Mahmoudi, assistant professor, and Ali Akbar Ashkarran, research associate, illustrate how the method also can be applied to human blood plasma - the liquid component of blood. Plasma contains many types of proteins that perform a multitude of functions in the body.

When we put something in liquid, it separates into sediment by weight. But another force - the magnetic force ¬- can cancel out weight and levitate the proteins. This permits us to much more precisely define the density of proteins in solution."

Morteza Mahmoudi, assistant professor, Precision Health

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Disability in multiple sclerosis A reference for patients and clinicians

Abstract

Objective:

To create a reference table of disability outcomes in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that would enable patients to rank their disability relative to others' with similar disease duration and to develop a cost-effective research tool for comparing MS severity across patient populations and time periods.

Methods:

The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry collects disability data from patients with MS on a validated, 9-point Patient-Determined disease Steps (PDDS) scale. We compiled the disability Expectancy Table, which displays cumulative frequencies of PDDS scores for each year of disease duration, from 0 to 45 years. We also tabulated disease duration–adjusted mean ranks of PDDS scores, referred to as Patient-derived MS Severity Scores (P-MSSS).

Results:

The cohort consisted of 27,918 NARCOMS enrollees, 72.7% of whom were female and 90.1% of whom were white. Mean age at symptom onset was 30.1 ± 10.1 years, and age at enrollment was 47.1 ± 11.0 years. The disability Expectancy Table and P-MSSS afford a detailed overview of disability outcomes in a large MS cohort over a 45-year period. In the first year of disease, 15% of patients reported need of ambulatory aid, and 4% needed bilateral assistance or worse; after 45 years of disease, 76% of patients required ambulatory aid, and 52% bilateral assistance or worse. Proportion of patients who reported minimal or no interference in daily activities (PDDS ≤ 1) declined from 63% in the first year to 8% after 45 years of disease.

Conclusion:

The disability Expectancy Table allows individual patients to determine how their disability ranks relative to NARCOMS enrollees with the same disease duration. P-MSSS may be used to compare disability across patient populations and to track disease progression in patient cohorts. P-MSSS does not require a formal neurologic examination and may therefore find wide applicability as a practical and cost-effective outcome measure in epidemiologic studies.

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Original author: Stuart
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A Framework for Estimating the Burden of Chronic Diseases: Design and Application in the Context of Multiple Sclerosis


Abstract

Background: When population-based databases are unavailable, nationwide assessments of the disease burden of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) resort to clinical, administrative or convenience-sampled data sources, which may produce results of limited external validity. Our aim was to develop a framework for estimating measures of occurrence of chronic diseases, and more broadly disease burden, that mitigate these limitations and to apply this framework to estimate the prevalence of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Switzerland.
Methods: We developed a 7-step framework which implements the combination of several data sources together with a resampling and critical appraisal approach. The framework was applied to estimate the MS prevalence for 2016 in Switzerland, for which four distinct data sources (Swiss MS registry, Swiss national MS treatment registry, MediService database, and Swiss MS cohort study) were combined. Results were reviewed by disease experts and compared to earlier Swiss estimates and current prevalence estimates from other countries.
Results: We estimate that in the year 2016 between 14,650 and 15,700 persons with MS have been living in Switzerland, yielding a period prevalence of 174–187/100,000 inhabitants. Compared to the last estimate in 1986, we detected a substantial increase of MS diagnoses which coincides with a higher number of diagnoses in women below the age of 65.
Conclusions: Internationally, Switzerland is a high-prevalence country for MS, although estimates were somewhat lower than recent evaluations of Northern European countries. In addition, we corroborate previous reports that the prevalence increase coincides with a higher number of MS diagnoses among women. The proposed framework has wide applicability and the potential to place estimates of disease occurrence and burden with imperfect data availability on more solid grounds.

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A new way to estimate neurologic disease prevalence in the United States: Illustrated with MS

A new way to estimate neurologic disease prevalence in the United States: Illustrated with MS

Lorene M. Nelson, PhD, MS, Mitchell T. Wallin, MD, MPH, Ruth Ann Marrie, MD, PhD, W.J. Culpepper, PhD, Annette Langer-Gould, MD, PhD, Jon Campbell, PhD, Stephen Buka, ScD, Helen Tremlett, PhD, Gary Cutter, PhD, Wendy Kaye, PhD, Laurie Wagner, MPH, Nicholas G. Larocca, PhD, and for the United States Multiple Sclerosis Prevalence Workgroup


Abstract

Objective

Considerable gaps exist in knowledge regarding the prevalence of neurologic diseases, such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS), in the United States. Therefore, the MS Prevalence Working Group sought to review and evaluate alternative methods for obtaining a scientifically valid estimate of national MS prevalence in the current health care era.

Methods

We carried out a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis for 3 approaches to estimate MS prevalence: population-based MS registries, national probability health surveys, and analysis of administrative health claims databases. We reviewed MS prevalence studies conducted in the United States and critically examined possible methods for estimating national MS prevalence.

Results

We developed a new 4-step approach for estimating MS prevalence in the United States. First, identify administrative health claim databases covering publicly and privately insured populations in the United States. Second, develop and validate a highly accurate MS case-finding algorithm that can be standardly applied in all databases. Third, apply a case definition algorithm to estimate MS prevalence in each population. Fourth, combine MS prevalence estimates into a single estimate of US prevalence, weighted according to the number of insured persons in each health insurance segment.

Conclusions:  By addressing methodologic challenges and proposing a new approach for measuring the prevalence of MS in the United States, we hope that our work will benefit scientists who study neurologic and other chronic conditions for which national prevalence estimates do not exist.
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Long term effect of delayed treatment on disability in patients with paediatric onset multiple sclerosis: A prospective Danish cohort study.

Long term effect of delayed treatment on disability in patients with paediatric onset multiple sclerosis: A prospective Danish cohort study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A consensus of early treatment with disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) has been reached based on several observational and experimental studies in adults. However, paediatric onset (PO)MS appears phenotypically different from adult onset MS, characterized by increased relapse rate and pronounced radiological activity on MRI. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term consequences of delayed treatment start in POMS on disability in a real-world, population-based setting.

METHODS:

Based on prospectively collected data from The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, we defined a cohort of MS patients with onset before the age of 18 years, who were born in 1980 or later, and started treatment with a DMT between 1998 and 2018. The POMS cohort was stratified according to treatment start within 2 years of onset (N = 140) or later (N = 151). Annualised relapse rate in each study group was compared using a negative binomial regression; and Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of time to sustained Expanded disability Status Scale (EDSS) score 4, 6-month confirmed EDSS Worsening and 6-month confirmed EDSS improvement, respectively, according to disease duration.

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RESULTS:

The POMS cohort had a total median follow-up time of 7.7 years (interquartile range 4.6-11.6). There was no association between risk of relapses in patients with delayed treatment start compared to earlier treatment start. Patients starting on a DMT later than 2 years after onset had a 2.52-fold increased risk of reaching sustained EDSS 4 compared to those starting within 2 years of onset (HR=2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.01-6.34). For every year increment from onset to start of first DMT, the risk of reaching sustained EDSS 4 increased by 17% (HR=1.17, 95% CI=1.05-1.30). In line with this, the risk of reaching confirmed EDSS Worsening was increased by 44% compared to those starting earlier, although not statistically significant (HR=1.44, 95% CI=0.95-2.19). Starting on a DMT later was associated with 61% decreased chance of confirmed EDSS improvement compared to those starting earlier (HR=0.39, 95% CI=0.26-0.59). For every year increment from onset to starting DMT, the risk of confirmed EDSS improvement decreased by 10% (HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.84-0.96).

To Read the CONCLUSIONS:


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Kent State University launches redesigned Ph.D. program in its College of Nursing - Crain's Cleveland Business

• The undergraduate elementary teacher preparation program at the University of Akron is one of only 15 such programs nationwide, and the only one in Ohio, to earn an A+ rating for exemplary coursework and for serving as a model of excellence for others, according to a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality. The research and policy organization said the 15 top-performing programs "stand out because they fully satisfy" the following criteria: explicit and repeated instruction on each component of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension; support for instruction with high-quality textbooks that accurately detail established principles of scientifically based reading practices; and opportunities for teacher candidates to demonstrate mastery through in-class assignments, tests and instructional practice. Lisa Lenhart, Ph.D., professor of curricular and instructional studies at the University of Akron and lead literacy faculty in the LeBron James Family Foundation College of Education, said in a statement that all teacher candidates in early childhood, middle-level and special education "must take 12 semester hours in the teaching of reading during their studies, so having a strong reading core program matters significantly."

• The upcoming census is the focus of a program next week at the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs, "Census 2020: What You Need To Know." The event takes place on Tuesday, Feb. 11, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Roberta Steinbacher Atrium in the Levin College building on the Cleveland State University campus, 1717 Euclid Ave. The census counts the population every decade and "distributes more than $675 billion in federal funds annually to support states', counties' and communities' vital programs — impacting housing, education, transportation, employment, health care and public policy," according to promotional material for the event. Go here for information about the moderator, speaker and panelists at the event, and here to register. This program is sponsored by the Levin College Dean's Diversity Council.

• A drug created by researchers at Case Western Reserve University that could make it easier for doctors to diagnose Multiple Sclerosis in its earlier stages has been approved for its first human trials by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The university said the drug, known as Myeliviz, will be tested in clinical trials involving healthy volunteers at Cleveland Clinic Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis. The trials have been made possible by a $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, CWRU said. MS, an autoimmune disease affecting 2.3 million people worldwide, "can be a particularly difficult disease to diagnose," CWRU said, especially in its early stages, "due to unpredictable combinations of symptoms and their severity, and because of limitations in other available imaging methods." The university said Myeliviz "targets and binds to myelin — the sheathing surrounding nerves that is affected by MS — and allows for its imaging by a PET scanner, a common hospital tool."

• One more from CWRU: A team of researchers there, who "analyzed five years' worth of eviction data from the Cleveland Housing Court and spent several weeks in court interviewing those who were evicted," found "the threat of homelessness is just one of the worries for those losing their homes," according to this post from the university's website The Daily. "In addition to the mental and emotional toll of uprooting families to find Stable, affordable housing, children facing eviction are at a higher risk for lead exposure and poorer outcomes in the classroom, according to new research from the university's Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences," the university said. Here's how researchers from the school's Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development carried out two studies: "For the first, they observed 450 eviction cases and interviewed nearly 100 people facing eviction in Cleveland Housing Court. For the second, they linked eviction filing records from 2013-16 with administrative records to learn about residential mobility, homeless shelter use, school absenteeism and childhood lead testing and poisoning in low-income families facing eviction. The studies were commissioned by the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland."

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Dietary interventions may slow onset of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders - EurekAlert

Dietary interventions may slow onset of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders  EurekAlert
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New discovery provides hope for improved multiple sclerosis therapies - Medical Xpress

Demyelination by MS. The CD68 colored tissue shows several macrophages in the area of the lesion. Original scale 1:100. Credit: Marvin 101/Wikipedia

Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have made an important discovery that could lead to more effective treatments for people living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Their work highlights the significant potential of drugs targeting a specific immune molecule (IL-17) implicated in MS.

The scientists, led by Kingston Mills, Professor of Experimental Immunology, and Aoife McGinley, Postdoctoral Fellow, in Trinity's School of Biochemistry and Immunology have published their results today [Tuesday 4th February 2020] in the prestigious Cell press journal, Immunity.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating that affects around 2.3 million people globally and over 9,000 people in Ireland. It is associated with infiltration of immune cells into the brain and spinal cord that cause damage to nerves, leading to neurological disabilities.

However, the cause and precise immunological basis to this autoimmune disease is still unclear.

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Trinity researchers in potential MS treatment breakthrough - The Irish Times

An important discovery that could lead to more effective treatments for people living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, has been made by scientists from .

The researchers have identified the role played by a specific immune molecule, known as IL-17, in “priming” cells that cause the disease. Rather than being directly involved in damaging the nervous system, IL-17 kick-starts the disease-causing immune response that mediates the damage, they believe

Their work, published in Immunity scientific journal, also suggested there is significant potential in drugs that target the IL-17 molecule, both for MS and psoriasis/rheumatoid arthritis.

MS is a debilitating disease that affects some 2.3 million people globally and over 9,000 people in Ireland. It is associated with infiltration of immune cells into the brain and spinal cord that cause damage to nerves, leading to neurological disabilities.

However, the cause and precise immunological basis to this autoimmune disease is still unclear.

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Nuvaira Announces Chief Financial Officer and Pivotal Study Milestone - P&T Community

Seasoned Veteran Tom Griffin Joins Nuvaira's Executive Team

MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Nuvaira, a developer of novel therapeutic strategies to treat obstructive lung diseases, has announced that Tom Griffin has joined Nuvaira as Chief Financial Officer.

Tom Griffin has a 30-year track record of strong leadership guiding high-growth companies through investment financing, rapid commercialization growth and initial public offering stages.  Tom was most recently Chief Financial Officer of Avedro, Inc., a leading hybrid ophthalmic pharmaceutical and medical technology company.  Avedro completed its initial public offering in February 2019 and was acquired by Glaukos Corporation in November 2019.  Prior to joining Avedro, Tom served as the Chief Financial Officer of Entellus Medical, Inc., from 2007 to May 2016, guiding the company through its initial public offering in 2015.  Entellus was acquired by Stryker Corporation in February 2018.

"We are thrilled that Tom has joined our team," said Dennis Wahr, M.D., chief executive officer at Nuvaira. "His experience guiding start-up medical device companies through the critical clinical development phase with successful transition to commercial growth and public market offerings will be critical to Nuvaira's continued progress and success."

"Joining Nuvaira represents an extraordinary opportunity for me to be part of a dynamic and pioneering company that is deploying truly disruptive technologies that will benefit patients and provide value to physicians and the healthcare system," said Mr. Griffin.  "The company has an exciting vision for development of its therapy and I am looking forward to working with the team to achieve Nuvaira's strategic and financial growth objectives."

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There's hope - NHL.com

"That was the one thing I really wanted to do," she said. "Walk up the Rocky Museum stairs."

Climbing the stairs was a representation of Erin's own victory over adversity - in her case, a 40-year struggle with Multiple Sclerosis.

Erin, an athlete in her youth, was diagnosed with the disease at the age of 18. MS caused her the temporary loss of her right arm, both legs, eyesight and her athletic career. With physiotherapy and various drugs, Erin has been able to regain most of her faculties and live a relatively normal life, though she deals with pain daily.

"I find the older I get the more pain you have," she said. "Your nerves are constantly going into shock. Pain becomes daily life. You just fight it; I don't know what else to do. You've had it for so long that you just fight it."

That fighter mentality is what brought Erin to the base of the Philadelphia Art Museum in late June of 2014. Every journey begins with a single step. In spite of the pain and the limited use of her right leg, Erin took that first step. And the second. And the third.

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New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts

Writing in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, an international research team, led by physician-scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells (NSCs) to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells.

The findings are published in the Jan. 29, 2020 print issue.

NSCs hold great potential for treating a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries to the spinal cord. The stem cells possess the ability to differentiate into multiple types of neural cell, depending upon their environment. As a result, there is great interest and much effort to use these cells to repair spinal cord injuries and effectively restore related functions.

But current spinal cell delivery techniques, said Martin Marsala, MD, professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at UC San Diego School of Medicine, involve direct needle injection into the spinal parenchyma -- the primary cord of nerve fibers running through the vertebral column. "As such, there is an inherent risk of (further) spinal tissue injury or intraparechymal bleeding," said Marsala.

The new technique is less invasive, depositing injected cells into the spinal subpial space -- a space between the pial membrane and the superficial layers of the spinal cord.

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EHR Vendor Pays $145M to Settle Opioid Kickback Charges

An electronic health record (EHR) system developer agreed to pay $145 million to settle charges that it was involved in a kickback scheme to increase opioid prescriptions, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) said in a press release.

Practice Fusion, a cloud-based EHR vendor based in San Francisco, admitted that it received a nearly $1-million payment from a "major opioid company" to develop software that encouraged doctors to prescribe more opioids.

That money came out of the unnamed drugmaker's marketing budget, DOJ said.

The startup implemented clinical decision support (CDS) alerts -- a key function of health information technology platforms -- that marketed extended-release opioids to healthcare providers, according to DOJ.

It will pay $26 million in criminal fines and $118.6 million in civil settlements. This is the first time criminal action has been taken against an EHR vendor, according to DOJ.

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When Pregnant Moms Are Distressed, Fetal Brains May Suffer

Psychological distress -- a term encompassing anxiety, stress, and depression -- was more prevalent than expected in a sample of healthy, well-educated pregnant women and was associated with impaired fetal brain development, a prospective study suggested.

Among 119 pregnant women with uncomplicated pregnancies, 27% scored high on a perceived stress questionnaire, 26% had high scores for anxiety, and 11% had elevated symptoms of depression, according to Catherine Limperopoulos, PhD, of the Center for the Developing Brain at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C., and colleagues.

Increases in trait anxiety scores were associated with reductions in left hemisphere fetal brain volume, and elevated maternal stress and anxiety levels were tied to increased fetal gyrification (cortical folding) in frontal and temporal lobes, they reported in JAMA Network Open. Elevated maternal depression scores also were associated with reductions in fetal creatine and choline levels.

The study involved a group of well-resourced, well-educated women, and while the research is preliminary, "it points to prenatal psychological distress being alarmingly prevalent and clinically under-recognized," Limperopoulos said.

"We did not expect these findings among women expecting normal babies. These women had no indication of any mental health disorder, which leads us to worry that many women with similar maternal distress are slipping below the radar during routine clinical encounters," she told MedPage Today.

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More Flavonol, Less Alzheimer's

Higher flavonol intake was linked to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia in a prospective cohort study of older adults.

After adjusting for genetic, demographic, and lifestyle factors, people who consumed the highest dietary intake of flavonols were 48% less like to develop Alzheimer's dementia than people with the least intake, reported Thomas Holland, MD, of Rush University in Chicago, and colleagues, in Neurology.

"This research lends a further understanding of the contents of the foods we eat," Holland said. "The bioactives in foods -- which from our research would be specifically flavonols found in kale, spinach, tomatoes, tea, olive oil, apples, pears, and over 20 other foods -- have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that have the potential to protect against cellular damage due to oxidative stress and sustained inflammation," he told MedPage Today.

Flavonols are a type of flavonoid, a group of phytochemicals found in plant pigments. "Technically speaking, we knew little regarding flavonols, specifically, and Alzheimer's dementia," Holland said. Earlier research has looked at antioxidants and Alzheimer's risk, but no studies have researched whether dietary intake of flavonoid subclasses is associated with Alzheimer's dementia, he added.

This work complements other studies that show fruit and vegetables support brain health, observed Robert Friedland, MD, of the University of Louisville, who wasn't involved with the study.

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Heart Disease Risks Fall for Most Survivors of Childhood Cancer

(MedPage Today) -- Study Authors: Daniel A. Mulrooney, Geehong Hyun, et al.; Mike Hawkins, Alex Brownsdon, Raoul ReulenTarget Audience and Goal Statement: Oncologists, cardiologists, pediatricians, family physicians, primary care physicians...
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The effect of foot reflexology on constipation and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis. A randomized controlled trial

The effect of foot reflexology on constipation and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis. A randomized controlled trial

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Constipation is a major problem in most patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of foot reflexology on constipation and quality of life in patients with MS.

METHODS:

This study was a randomized controlled trial, in which 63 patients with MS referred to Arak MS Society, Iran were participated (from May to Dec. 2018). In this study participants were selected according to inclusion criteria and randomly divided into intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 30) groups. In the intervention group, foot reflexology was applied twice a week for 6 weeks (each session lasted about 30-40 min). Data were collected using demographic questionnaire, Constipation Assessment Scale (CAS) and Short Form (SF) 36 Quality of Life (QOL) questionnaire. 
Finally, the data were analyzed using SPSS Ver. 16 and descriptive and inferential statistical tests.
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RESULTS:

The results of the study showed that severity of constipation and QOL score were not significant between the two groups before intervention (p > 0.05), but; after intervention, severity of constipation significantly decreased in the reflexology group (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, after intervention, the QOL was improved in the reflexology group compared to the control group but was not significant (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study showed that foot reflexology, as an effective intervention can be useful in management of constipation in patients with MS. Therefore, this intervention can be applied as a safe method for the decrease of constipation in MS patients.



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Magic Mushrooms Ease Cancer Anxiety; Olanzapine/Samidorphan NDA Accepted

Just one dose of synthetic psilocybin -- the compound in magic mushrooms -- alleviated anxiety and depression in cancer patients for up to five years. (Journal of Psychopharmacology)

Based on the ENLIGHTEN program, the FDA accepted Alkermes' application for its schizophrenia and bipolar disorder treatment ALKS 3831 (olanzapine/samidorphan) with an expected action date of November.

Although it was FDA approved in March 2019, esketamine nasal spray (Spravato) was not recommended for inclusion as a reimbursable drug in the U.K. by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) due to the safety profile. (BBC)

A Rhode Island cohort study found that girls received an autism diagnosis roughly 1.5 years later on average than boys. (Autism Research)

Antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction may continue long after stopping treatment. "Some likely comfort themselves with the thought that once they stop treatment, they will get back to normal, when in fact they may be even less able to function," stated David Healy, MD, of Bangor University, writing in a commentary in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

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Repurposed Mucolytic Shows Promise for Neuroprotection in Parkinson's Disease

(MedPage Today) -- Study Authors: Stephen Mullin, Laura Smith, et al.Target Audience and Goal Statement: Neurologists, radiologists, neuropsychologists, pulmonologists, family physiciansThe goal of this study was to assess the safety, tolerability...
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