'Blinking Guy' Channels Meme Fame Into Multiple Sclerosis Fundraiser - NPR

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'Blinking Guy' Channels Meme Fame Into Multiple Sclerosis Fundraiser

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If you've been on social media in the past two years, you've probably seen Drew Scanlon's face as the "blinking white guy" gif. He's now raising money for Multiple Sclerosis research.

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MS Walk fundraiser planned - Muskogee Daily Phoenix

Shelly Sheffield maintains an optimistic outlook on her life.

Not even Multiple Sclerosis has affected the Gore resident negatively after first she was diagnosed 30 years ago.    

"I'm in contact with a lot people who have MS, and it can be a very lonely disease because you see see other people doing things that you can't do or wish you could do," Sheffield said. "I have such a variety of family, friends and a support group that don't allow me ever to feel sorry for myself."

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body.

Sheffield, one of six children, doesn't let MS slow her down. 

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St. Cloud therapist diagnosed with MS running across the state - St. Cloud Times

, St. Cloud Times Published 1:49 p.m. CT Sept. 21, 2019

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ST. CLOUD — A St. Cloud physical therapist who decided to run across the state after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis broke the 400-mile mark of his journey Friday.  

Chad Mickelson, 38, began his run Sept. 4 near New Albin, Iowa. Mickelson was diagnosed with MS in July and decided to run diagonally across the state — a distance of around 600 miles. 

"For me, personally, I want to feel like my body can do it," Mickelson, who lives in Richmond and works at the St. Cloud Hospital, said. 

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Man behind 'Blinking White Guy' GIF fundraising to help fight Multiple Sclerosis - WKYC.com

You've seen it. You may have shared it in your social media feeds. Now, the man you see blinking in a widely-used GIF used to express confusion or disbelief wants your help so he can help those fighting Multiple Sclerosis.

The famous blinking GIF is Drew Scanlon -- some have mistaken it for actors Cary Elwes or Michael C. Hall. KPIX reports the GIF was created when Scanlon was captured making the facial gesture in 2013 during a group chat on a video game stream. It would be four years before he went viral.

Scanlon is now using his fame to help fundraise for an upcoming two-day, 120-mile bike ride from San Francisco to wine country to help people with MS.

RELATED: Author JK Rowling makes huge gift for MS research

RELATED: 4 women in remission from MS thanks to experimental treatment

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Studies Report on Efforts to Optimize Rituximab in MS, NMOSD - The Center for Biosimilars

While rituximab does not carry indications for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) or aquaporin-4-positive (AQP4) neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), the CD20-depleting therapy and its biosimilars are commonly used off-label, as the therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing relapses in MS as well as in reducing the frequency and severity of attacks in NMOSD.

The availability of biosimilar rituximab—already a reality in Europe and soon to arrive in the United States—has the potential to increase patient access to anti-CD20 therapy, but despite the common use of the drug in neurology, there are few data that help guide individual patients’ treatment with rituximab. Important questions remain, such as how long a patient should ideally be treated with rituximab, on what schedule treatment should occur, or what therapies may be optimal after treatment with the product is discontinued.

During last week’s 35th Annual Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, which was held in Stockholm, Sweden, multiple teams presented findings on the use of rituximab in both of these challenging neurological disorders.

First, in a poster session, researchers from the Institute of Neuropathology and University Medical Center Göttingen, in Göttingen, Germany, presented findings on their study on the phenotype and function of B cells that reappear after treatment with rituximab.1

The researchers assessed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 15 patients with relapsing MS prior to rituximab therapy and during B-cell repletion. They found that, while most B cells before rituximab treatment were mature memory B cells, the B cells that reappeared showed a naïve phenotype, and also manifested an accentuated activation profile and a more proinflammatory cytokine profile.

These findings suggest the need for further exploration of the phenotype of these repleting B cells to help guide therapeutic decisions, particularly with regard to maintenance therapies that may be initiated after treatment with anti-CD20 agents like rituximab.

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Man behind viral ‘blinking guy’ GIF backs multiple sclerosis fundraiser - WTKR News 3

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — For anyone who has ever tried to craft the perfect text with just the right GIF to convey a feeling of confusion, he is right there for the using. Now, he has a request for the world at large.

** Embargo San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA**
Drew Scanlon is hoping to raise money for the Waves to Wine bike ride for the national MS society.

“I wasn’t even the focus of the video, says internet staple Drew Scanlon. “He was playing a video game, and I was just kind of next to him.”

It was December of 2013 when Scanlon sat down to join a group commenting on a video game stream. The GIF of his puzzled reaction to a friend’s joke would not go viral for another four years.

“It was when people in our audience were saying, ‘My mom just sent me this GIF; she doesn’t even know who you are,’” Scanlon said of his viral emergence.

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MS Risk Nearly Doubles 15 Years Following Teen Concussion - Medscape

STOCKHOLM — People who experience a concussion during adolescence are at significantly elevated risk for multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, especially 15 years or more following their head trauma, a large retrospective study suggests.

This risk for developing MS over time nearly doubled in this population compared with people without a history of concussion.

"We also found a significantly increased risk among males and not females" starting at about 8 years post-concussion in a secondary analysis, lead study author Christopher Povolo, BSc, of the Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada, told Medscape Medical News.

The findings were presented during a poster session here at the 35th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) 2019.

Previously, other investigators linked head trauma, including concussion, with MS.

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Clinical Challenges: MS and Pregnancy | Medpage Today - MedPage Today

It wasn't so long ago that clinicians counseled patients with Multiple Sclerosis against pregnancy in the belief that it would make their MS worse.

That view has since proved demonstrably incorrect, thanks to studies such as one published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1998 showing that relapse rates actually decline during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester, while increasing in the first three months postpartum and then returning to the pre-pregnancy level.

And this seems to have had an impact on birth rates among women with MS. According to a study last year in Neurology, pregnancy rates among women with MS increased from 7.91% in 2006 to 9.47% in 2014, while the rate among women without MS and with pregnancy decreased from 8.83% to 7.75%

There is even recent evidence that postpartum flareups in MS disease activity may not be as bad as previously thought.

Preliminary results from a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology earlier this year, using data from the Kaiser Permanente Southern and Northern California databases spanning 2008 to 2016, indicated that women with MS who became pregnant did not experience increased risk of relapse after pregnancy.

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#ECTRIMS2019 - Mayzent's Benefits for MS Patients a 'Key Question,' Says EXPAND's Principal Investigator - Multiple Sclerosis News Today

The most recent data continue to support Mayzent‘s (siponimod) benefits and provide more insights on how this therapy can make a difference for those with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) — in particular, data showing the therapy lowers the risk of becoming wheelchair-dependent.

New results from the pivotal Phase 3 EXPAND trial were presented at the 35th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS), held Sept. 11–13 in Stockholm.

Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March this year, Novartis‘ Mayzent is a new sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator, indicated for the treatment of people with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and active secondary progressive MS (SPMS).

Data from the EXPAND study (NCT01665144) was one of the key pieces of evidence for Mayzent’s approval. Involving 1,651 patients with SPMS (both active and non-active), the study showed that taking 2 mg tablets of Mayzent once per day reduced the risk of disability progression at three months by 33% in those with active, relapsing disease, and by 13% in those with non-active SPMS.

The therapy also decreased the annualized relapse rate by 55%, reduced the progression of brain lesions, and lessened whole-brain volume loss (brain atrophy), measured in the overall population (active and non-active SPMS); a further analysis demonstrated an additional benefit for improving cognitive processing speed.

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MS in the Media - ECTRIMS 2019 - MS Trust

MS in the Media - ECTRIMS 2019  MS Trust

The ECTRIMS (European Committee for Treatment and Research In Multiple Sclerosis) is the largest annual international conference devoted to basic and ...

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Pilates and neurological disease - Idaho State Journal

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AJMC® in the Press, September 13, 2019 - AJMC.com Managed Markets Network

Coverage of our peer-reviewed research and news reporting in the healthcare and mainstream press.

A study published in this month’s issue ofThe American Journal of Managed Care®(AJMC®) evaluated the patterns of clinical service for long-term nursing home residents enrolled in UnitedHealthcare’s Medicare Advantage Institutional Special Needs Plans. The study, “Managed Care for Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents: An Evaluation of Institutional Special Needs Plans,” was featured in an article inSkilled Nursing News.

The study “The Potential Impact of CAR T-Cell Treatment Delays on Society,” which was published in the August issue of AJMC®, was the focus of an article from Hematology Advisor. The study concluded that the social value of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is significantly limited by treatment delays and that efficient payment mechanisms, adequate capital, and payment policy reform are urgently needed to increase patient access and maximize the value of the treatment.

Mountain Grove News Journal’s article on the impact of depression referred to a 2014 study published in AJMC®, which examined health claims data to assess medication adherence rates and healthcare costs for psychiatric patients. The study, “Pharmacogenetic-Guided Psychiatric Intervention Associated With Increased Adherence and Cost Savings,” found that patients whose clinicians had access to pharmacogenetic test results had increased adherence and overall cost savings.

AJMC®’s video series “Identifying Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis” was highlighted by Multiple Sclerosis News Today. The video series, which features multiple key opinion leaders, includes discussions on the nature and cost of Multiple Sclerosis, debates on whether it is truly an autoimmune disease, and more.

Both EcoWatch and Xherald included an article from AJMC.com, the website of AJMC®, in their pieces on the impact of sugary drinks. The article, “Large European Study Links Soda Consumption to Greater Risk of Mortality, Including From Parkinson,” reported on study findings showing that soft drinks were linked to a greater risk of death, as well as a higher chance of dying from Parkinson disease.

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Genmab A/S (GMAB) Detailed Results from Phase III ASCLEPIOS I & II Studies of Ofatumumab in Patients with Relapsing MS Presented at ECTRIMS - StreetInsider.com

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#ECTRIMS2019 - Transplanting MSCs Safe, Helps Stop Progressive MS - Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Transplanting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is safe and can delay disease progression in people with active, progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS), according to results from a single-center clinical trial conducted in Israel.

Six months after the transplant, a considerable proportion of patients showed no signs of disease activity, compared to placebo treatment.

The findings were shared at the 35th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS), held Sept. 11–13 in Stockholm.

Dimitrios Karussios, MD, PhD, a neurologist at Israel’s Hadassah University Hospital, presented the trial’s results in a talk titled “Indications of neuroprotective effects in progressive multiple sclerosis following autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) transplantation: report of a randomised phase IIb double blind trial.

Recent studies have raised hope for adult stem cell therapy as an MS treatment to slow disease progression and help repair damage to the nervous system.

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A Cheap Biotech Stock Tests a Novel Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis - Barron's

Atara Biotherapeutics has an out-of-favor stock and a novel treatment for Multiple Sclerosis that’s in early clinical trials. At an international meeting of MS doctors on Friday, researchers reported that Atara’s therapy showed hints of actually improving the condition of MS patients, instead of just slowing the disease like most available treatments.

If subsequent trials over the next few years confirm the treatment’s effectiveness, Atara could enter the market for MS drugs. That market approached $20 billion last year, so the opportunity will be significant, for a company of Atara’s size.

The South San Francisco-based firm (ticker: ATRA) had a $50 stock and $3 billion market capitalization last year. Today, its stock trades below $16 and its market cap is just $870 million. That is why investors may want to pay attention to the progress of the MS treatment that Atara currently calls ATA188.

Friday afternoon, at the annual meeting of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, in Stockholm, a group of doctors led by University of Pennsylvania researcher Amit Bar-On will present results on the first dozen patients treated with Atara’s therapy. The Phase 1 study was primarily designed to test safety, but it also measured the treatment’s effect on the patients’ symptoms.

The patients all have a severe form of Multiple Sclerosis called “progressive,” in which their condition continuously declines—instead of the sometimes remitting, then relapsing, form that is most common. There are few treatments available for the progressive forms of the disease.

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#ECTRIMS2019 - Longer DMT Use and Female Sex Seen to Protect Against SPMS Conversion - Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS), and people who stay in a relapsing stage or use disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for longer periods are less likely to transition to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) than others, according to a study based on the Italian MS registry.

But patients whose disease starts after age 40, have a multifocal onset (multiple lesions and symptoms), greater disability at MS onset, and repeat relapses are more likely to progress to SPMS.

DMT exposure was the only significant “protective factor” in this transition found in two models of SPMS conversion used in this study.

These findings were detailed by Pietro Iaffaldano, a neurologist and researcher at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, in Italy, at the 35th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) running through Friday in Stockholm.

His presentation was titled “Defining the risk factors for the conversion to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a retrospective cohort study of the Italian MS Register.“

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Anokion Presents New Data Describing Transformative Therapeutic Approach for Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis at ECTRIMS Congress - streetinsider.com

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J.K. Rowling Gives $18M to Multiple Sclerosis Research - TIME

(LONDON) — Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has made a substantial donation for research into the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis at a center named after her late mother.

The 15.3 million-pound ($18.8 million) donation announced Thursday will be used for new facilities at a research center based at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. The author’s mother suffered from the disease and died at the age of 45.

The new gift follows a major donation Rowling made in 2010 that started the Anne Rowling clinic at the university.

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‘It’s Not A Death Sentence’: Growing Number Of Young Women Being Diagnosed With Multiple Sclerosis - CBS Philly

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A growing number of young people — especially women in their 20s and 30s — are being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. Fortunately, there are several new treatments that allow many patients to live healthy lives.

MS can be debilitating, but it doesn’t have to be. A Philadelphia dancer thought her days on point were over when she was diagnosed, but you’d never know.

“For me, it was really important to tell this story,” Danielle Bourgeon said.

It’s a story about resilience, how dance helped the 34-year-old Bourgeon get her life back.

“I was completely paralyzed on my left side,” Bourgeon said.

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J.K. Rowling makes $18.8 million donation to multiple sclerosis research - WRBL

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Posted: Sep 12, 2019 / 04:29 PM EDT / Updated: Sep 12, 2019 / 04:29 PM EDT

LONDON (AP) – Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has made a substantial donation for research into the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis at a center named after her late mother.

The 15.3 million-pound ($18.8 million) donation announced Thursday will be used for new facilities at a research center based at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. The author’s mother suffered from the disease and died at the age of 45.

The new gift follows a major donation Rowling made in 2010 that started the Anne Rowling clinic at the university.

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