Bristol Myers Squibb Receives Positive CHMP Opinion Recommending Approval of ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Active Disease | Small Molecules | News Channels - PipelineReview.com

Bristol Myers Squibb Receives Positive CHMP Opinion Recommending Approval of ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Active disease

Details Hits: 101

PRINCETON, NJ, USA I March 27, 2020 IBristol Myers Squibb (NYSE:BMY) today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a positive opinion for ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the treatment of adult patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) with active disease as defined by clinical or imaging features. ZEPOSIA is an oral, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator that binds with high affinity selectively to S1P subtypes 1 (S1P1) and 5 (S1P5). The CHMP recommendation will now be reviewed by the European Commission, which has the authority to approve medicines for the European Union.

“This positive CHMP opinion reinforces that ZEPOSIA has the potential to become an important treatment option for patients with Relapsing Remitting MS with active disease. There remains a need for effective and safe therapies that impact both the relapses and brain lesions that are characteristic of this disease,” said Samit Hirawat, M.D., chief medical officer, Bristol Myers Squibb. “We look forward to the European Commission’s decision and the potential to bring ZEPOSIA to patients in the EU.”

The CHMP adopted the positive opinion based on data from the randomized, active-controlled Phase 3 SUNBEAM™ and RADIANCE™ Part B clinical trials, which enrolled more than 2,600 patients across 150 sites in more than 20 countries. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ZEPOSIA for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) on March 25, 2020.

About SUNBEAM™

SUNBEAM is a pivotal, phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy, safety and tolerability of two doses of oral ZEPOSIA (0.92 mg and 0.46 mg, equivalent to 1 mg and 0.5 mg ozanimod HCI, respectively) against weekly intramuscular AVONEX® (interferon beta-1a) for at least a 12-month treatment period. The study included 1,346 people living with RMS across 152 sites in 20 countries.

Continue reading
  32 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

32 Hits

Muir scion helps bring 'access' to Suisun Marsh setting - Fairfield Daily Republic

SUISUN CITY — Michael Muir has not let a diagnoses of Multiple Sclerosis stop him from enjoying the outdoors, even if it is from his wheelchair.

The 68-year-old’s love of horses keeps him ticking along just fine. Over the past 55 years, he has represented the United States four times in world and international championship carriage driving competitions, winning medals and championship honors in Germany, Austria, France and Great Britain.

He also founded Access Adventure in 2005, enriching the lives of people with disabilities, injured veterans, at-risk youth, senior citizens and children with special needs. His program provides the opportunity for therapy through educational, outdoor activities.

The program also provides people with disabilities of all ages the opportunity to ride and learn about recreational carriage driving and therapeutic driving. Access Adventure provides youth programs and specialized educational opportunities relating to preservation, ecology, wildlife habitat and rangeland management.

His work doesn’t stop there. He breeds the Stonewall Sporthorses at Rush Ranch headquarters on Grizzly Island Road, which has created a livelihood for him and an adventure far beyond what he could have dreamed.

Continue reading
  15 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

15 Hits

My Top 3 Drug Stocks to Buy in the Market Crash - The Motley Fool

Drug stocks are tumbling as investors worry about how the coronavirus outbreak may impact their operations. The pandemic, which is halting a great part of the world economy, may also slow clinical trials, drug development, and drug manufacturing. In spite of these near-term -- and temporary -- disruptions, the following three pharma stocks are bargains today considering future revenue prospects.

Image source: Getty Images.

1. Sanofi

Sanofi (NASDAQ:SNY) has been making headlines for its work on coronavirus treatment and prevention. While any success there would be a plus, my attention is on products with more potential for long-term growth. Sanofi must find ways to compensate for declines in older blockbuster drugs. Diabetes drug Lantus is a good example. The drug used to generate $7 billion annually, but competition from biosimilars and other new drugs has halved that figure.

New CEO Paul Hudson's strategy involves a shift into higher growth areas. He ended Sanofi's diabetes and cardiovascular research, and in January, Sanofi completed the acquisition of immuno-oncology company Synthorx. The French drugmaker also is betting on eczema drug Dupixent, and in the latest earnings report said the drug is on its way to the goal of generating peak sales of $11 billion. In the fourth quarter, Dupixent sales surged 135% and annual sales soared 152% to $2.3 billion. Sanofi shares are down 18% so far this year, offering a decent entry point to bet on the company's transformation.

2. Novartis

What I like most about Novartis (NYSE:NVS) right now is the fact that it started the year with more newly approved drugs than any other big pharma company. The Food and Drug Administration approved five new Novartis drugs last year, and Novartis says each has blockbuster potential.

Continue reading
  23 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

23 Hits

Novartis CEO: Malaria drug is biggest hope against coronavirus - SonntagsZeitung - Reuters

ZURICH, March 29 (Reuters) - Novartis Chief Executive Vas Narasimhan said his Sandoz generics unit’s malaria, lupus and arthritis drug hydroxychloroquine is the company’s biggest hope against the coronavirus, Swiss newspaper SonntagsZeitung reported on Sunday.

Novartis has pledged to donate 130 million doses and is supporting clinical trials needed before the medicine, which U.S. President Donald Trump also has been promoting, can be approved for use against the coronavirus.

Other companies including Bayer and Teva have also agreed to donate hydroxychloroquine or similar drugs, while Gilead Sciences is testing its experimental drug remdesivir against coronavirus.

“Pre-clinical studies in animals as well as the first data from clinical studies show that hydroxychloroquine kills the coronavirus,” Narasimhan told the newspaper. “We’re working with Swiss hospitals on possible treatment protocols for the clinical use of the drug, but it’s too early to say anything definitively.”

He said the company is currently looking for additional active drug ingredients to make more hydroxychloroquine, should clinical trials be successful.

Continue reading
  43 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

43 Hits

Ronald Eugene Cheatham - San Marcos Daily Record

As a public service, public health stories are free to Central Texans during the coronavirus crisis. Please support our local journalists by subscribing today. Call 512-392-2458.

Interested in submitting an obituary? Learn how to do so by clicking here.

Sun, 03/29/2020 - 12:00am

Born: June 24th, 1951 San Marcos, TX

Died: March 20th, 2020 Austin, TX

Attended Dunbar School, Graduate of San Marcos High School Attended New Mexico Highlands University

Continue reading
  5 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

5 Hits

Demyelinating Risks With Anti-TNF Vary in Rheumatic Diseases - MedPage Today

Patients with certain types of arthritic conditions were at elevated risk for developing neuroinflammatory events if treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, a large prospective cohort study conducted in Denmark and Sweden found.

Among Swedish patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who were exposed to TNF inhibitors, there was a 50% greater risk for any neuroinflammatory event compared with unexposed patients (HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07-2.11), according to Tine Iskov Kopp, PhD, of the department of neurology at Rigshospitalet Glostrup in Denmark, and colleagues.

And among Danish patients with AS or PsA who used TNF inhibitors, the risk increased 3.4-fold (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.30-8.96), the researchers reported online in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

However, there was no significantly increased risk for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with hazard ratios of 0.97 (95% CI 0.72-1.33) in Sweden and 1.45 (95% CI 0.74-2.81) in Denmark.

The inflammatory cytokine TNF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), with high levels present in the cerebral lesions and cerebrospinal fluid of patients. In addition, MS patients who were treated with TNF inhibitors in early clinical trials showed disease exacerbations.

Continue reading
  157 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

157 Hits

Gym Closed? A Home Workout for an Anxious Time - City Limits

Porsche Landon

The author at work.

Like many, my fiancé and I have tried to make the best of social distancing. Today marks one week that we have been confined to the house.

It started out as an opportunity for us to make some hearty recipes we had been too busy to make this winter, bake some new things, and catch up on all of the shows we haven’t had time for. But this weekend it really hit us that we are settling into our new reality, for the foreseeable future.

As a person living with Multiple Sclerosis, a big part of our life is health and fitness. When we learned that our building’s gym is now closed to avoid the spread of COVID-19, we had to quickly re-evaluate how we can spend our time without compromising our health priorities. 

We decided to put down the margaritas and transformed our living room into an exercise area. Since then, we have been coming up with routines to make sure we are staying committed to our well-being while cooped up. 

Continue reading
  122 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

122 Hits

Rita A. Lavoie - Obituaries - Worcester Telegram

 

Westminster-Rita A. (LeMieur) Lavoie, 77, died Friday, March 13, 2020 at Alliance Health at Baldwinville, after an illness.

She leaves her husband Edgar J. Lavoie: two daughters, Catherine Bedard of Leominster and her husband David and Deborah Lavoie-Overbey of Pfafftown, NC and her husband Bill; four grandchildren; Matthew Bedard and Jennifer Bedard both of Leominster and Grace-Ashley Rosario and David Rosario both of Pfafftown, NC; one sister, Carol Weatherbee of King, NC and several nieces and nephews.

Rita was born in Gardner, on July 28, 1942 a daughter of the late Henry and Agnes (Johnson) LeMieur. She was a graduate of Gardner High School. Rita worked for Simplex and later in life for Shirley Catering in the office. She enjoyed horseback riding, photography and painting. Her compassion for others was unwavering.

Continue reading
  35 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

35 Hits

L-Methylfolate: Augmenting Agent May Contribute to Agitation and Mania - Psychiatric Times

L-methylfolate is commonly presented as a safe augmenting agent to patients with antidepressant non-response in unipolar depression with virtually no side effects. Although this is likely to be true most of the time, as with any treatment, there are risks that can be significant albeit rare. Currently, there is a paucity of published literature of double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials of the efficacy and tolerability of L-methylfolate in both unipolar and bipolar depression. This article discusses the rationale and history of L-methylfolate use in such patients, and then shares three cases that collectively suggest L-methylfolate may contribute to agitation and mania.

L-methylfolate

In humans, folate (ie, Vitamin B9) is one of 13 essential vitamins. Low serum folate and low red blood cell (RBC) folate levels are independent risk factors for major depressive disorder (MDD); they also are associated with more severe depressive episodes and poor response to antidepressant treatment.1,2 Maternal folate deficiency prior to conception and throughout pregnancy has been shown to increase the risk of neural tube defects and congenital abnormalities in the developing fetus, as well as peripheral neuropathy and anemia in the mother.3

Ongoing studies in psychiatry and obstetrics support the use of oral dosing with the bioactive form of folate, L-methylfolate. L-methylfolate is FDA approved as a medicinal supplement for antidepressant augmentation.4 The use of L-methylfolate allows the clinician to bypass a critical metabolic step in folate’s transformation to L-methylfolate, specifically the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate to L-methylfolate by the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). MTHFR is the rate limiting step in this process, and significantly, MTHFR enzymatic activity has a wide range of function depending on its genetic polymorphisms at three nucleic acid sites, the most significant being: C677C (good activity), C677T (decreased activity), and T677T (poor activity).

L-methylfolate is the only form of folate that can cross the blood-brain barrier, where it plays an essential role in the one carbon cycle metabolic pathway that is required for the production of the monoamines serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine.5

Continue reading
  54 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

54 Hits

Opinion: Who Will Decide Your Death? - Pine and Lakes Echo Journal

After battling Multiple Sclerosis for twelve years my wife was in the Intensive Care Unit of a hospital. The care had been good and everyone was attentive. The physician in charge of her care pulled me aside one day and said, "Glenn, you know, there comes a time for all of us and your wife has suffered with this disease for a long time. Don't you think it's time we let her go on?" He then added, "We can let her go on or we can try to extend her life as long as possible." "Doc," I replied, "I want her to live as long as possible." "Good enough," he said, "That's what we will try to do."

She lived about two weeks or so after that conversation. During those two weeks she spent quality time with family, her sons and I. She had visitors who had conversations with her. Before her death she was able to speak clearly to me and state her thoughts and wishes. I remember the day we had to take her back to the nursing home that she ate one of the better meals that she had eaten in several weeks. Those two weeks was time that I know she would not have wanted to have given up, nor would I.

I have found it interesting looking back now that a couple of the nurses at the nursing home stated to me the day that we got her back to the nursing home, "Glenn, we are so sorry." It was like they were saying they were sorry about my wife's death and looking back, that's exactly what they were talking about. It was like the hospital had said to the nursing home staff, "There is nothing more to be done and it's time to let her die." My question all along has been did they let her die, or did they push or move her death along a little faster? It seemed after her meal that she enjoyed, that she suddenly started going downhill fast, became quieter, groggy and eventually lulled into a sleep in which she never woke up and passed away.

A friend of mine had a stroke recently. A lady who I know who used to work in the hospital said, "After seven days, Medicare will give the hospital an ultimatum. Either she is going to get better or they will tell the hospital to unhook her and let her die." She had a living will and so the hospital staff used the living will to state, "This is what she wants."

I've taken note lately that every place I go is pushing a living will document at me. I'm going to have one, but I'll write it. I don't need an insurance provider or Medicare writing my living will for me. Whose advantage is the living will for if they have written the document and I have merely signed it? It's more for their bottom line.

Continue reading
  38 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

38 Hits

The crossword king called Loudonville home | History - Ashland Source

LOUDONVILLE -- If you were a fan of crossword puzzles in the 1960s, and found yourself stuck on such ambiguous definitions as "Dickens character," "African boat," "oleoresin" and "Peleg's father" you had Loudonville resident George Frank to thank for your misery.

George, who suffered from Multiple Sclerosis, designed thousands of crossword puzzles that were printed around the country -- from New York newspapers to crossword magazines. He began by designing large 23x23 "brain busters" that took nearly 12 hours to design before eventually moving on to smaller 15x15 or 13x13 puzzles.

Though a master designer, puzzles never paid much. In his most lucrative year as a designer he made only $650. A 23x23 Brain Buster brought in no more than $20, while the smaller ones paid $4 to $5, but took only an hour to design compared to an entire day for the brain busters.

To supplement his puzzle income, George ran a steady business in making greeting cards and stationary. He worked in duplicating and typing, as well as serving as a correspondent for several area newspapers.

George's only gripe with the crossword puzzle industry?

Continue reading
  92 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

92 Hits

Look back at pharma news in the week to March 6, 2020 - The Pharma Letter

US biotech Gilead Sciences stepped further into the immuno-oncology arena last week, announcing a $4.9…

AstraZenecaCompanies, mergers and acquisitionsCoronavirusDrug TrialFocus OnForty Seven IncGilead SciencesHematologyImfinziImmuno-oncologymagrolimabPharmaceuticalResearchSanofiSarclisaTAK-888TakedaVaccines

  120 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

120 Hits

To stay younger for longer, make this change to your diet - Haaretz

The Western world is in the throes of an epidemic. It’s sparking an incidence of disease on a frightening scale, spreading low self-esteem and shortening life expectancy among millions of people. The whole world is now preoccupied with the coronavirus, but its the obesity epidemic that continues to claim victims apace, and in spectacular numbers. The culture of abundance may offer nutrition security, but it also exacts a steep price.

Staying on a diet to reduce one’s weight is difficult; results are hard to achieve and maintain in the long term. But the problem runs deeper: It is very tough to improve scientific knowledge about obesity, because it entails carrying out research over many years involving documentation of what people consume.

But what if there is another way to confront the problem of overeating? What if there’s a method of nutrition that can increase one’s life expectancy by 30 percent, as has already been seen in hundreds of studies on animals? Moreover, what if scientists could show that this method not only facilitates weight loss but improves cognitive abilities and can slow down the development of a host of diseases, ranging from diabetes and Multiple Sclerosis to cancer and cardiac ailments? And what if this whole method is summed up in a simple rule: to limit the time frame for eating to eight hours daily and to abstain from food for the rest of the day?

In December, neuroscientist Mark P. Mattson and gerontologist Rafael de Cabo, from Johns Hopkins University, published a seminal article in the New England Journal of Medicine, the world’s most prestigious medical journal. The two offered a survey of two decades of research on the habit of fasting for part of the day, and found a solid scientific basis for a diet that has become increasingly popular in recent years: to concentrate meals into an eight-hour period and refrain from eating for the other 16 hours.

In the article, entitled “Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Health, Aging, and disease,” De Cabo and Mattson went beyond presenting the health-related advantages of such a regime. Indeed, they called for revamping existing nutrition recommendations for the general public. Whereas today people are being urged to adopt a so-called Mediterranean diet and eat small meals scattered throughout the day, the two scientists from Baltimore propose the conducting of a long-term study on intermittent fasting, as well as the integration of such a diet into the recommendations of modern medicine. The benefits could be dramatic.

Continue reading
  180 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

180 Hits

Karen E. Dittrich - Baltimore Sun

Karen E. Dittrich  Baltimore Sun
  42 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

42 Hits

3-8 Local business briefs - Norman Transcript

OU’s EMBA in Energy Program reports rankings gains

The University of Oklahoma’s Energy Institute had two major rankings for its Executive MBA in Energy program. The institute, which is facilitated by OU’s Michael F. Price College of Business, received three write-ups in the February issue of Hart Energy’s industry magazine, Oil and Gas Investor, including the No. 1 ranking in its premiere Top 15 Energy Graduate Programs listing.

Additionally, the program was ranked No. 10 in Ivy Exec’s Top EMBA Programs in the U.S. Southwest.

According to Oil and Gas Investor, OU’s EMBA in Energy program, which places senior energy industry experts alongside students, creates “an environment of intensive collaboration and networking” and is “carefully designed to provide students with the exact tools they need to advance.”

According to Ivy Exec’s website, “the University of Oklahoma’s Executive MBA in Energy not only provides the core functional business disciplines and skills of an executive MBA but also delivers advanced, specialized knowledge of the energy industry. OU’s 15-month, primarily online program provides you with the business tools, practical insights and critical skills essential to compete and advance in the global energy business.”

Continue reading
  67 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

67 Hits

Pilates and Kale Smoothies Helped Save this Local Blogger's Life - Mainline Today

Adobe Stock Photo. 

 

The creation of The Studio by The Pilates Blonde, 26-year-old Katie Dudley, was a long time coming. Back in 2006 at the age of 12, Dudley was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in every joint but one. Subsequently, doctors put her on a regimen of low dose chemotherapy drugs. By the age of 15, the conversation shifted to talks of a double knee replacement as her medication had withered her joints. In the years that followed, those medications began to shut down the frontal lobe of Dudley’s brain, causing seizures, severe weight gain and the inability to remember menial tasks like starting a car.  

Feeling hopeless, the Dudley family reached out to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The team ruled out a brain tumor and Multiple Sclerosis, concluding that the symptoms were a result of an allergic reaction to her current medications paired with an undiagnosed case of the autoimmune disease Lupus.  

Courtesy of Katie Dudley.

“When I came home, I broke up with my doctor and found a new one,” Dudley says of her life-altering trip to Minnesota. “That moment was so freeing because it wasn’t a death sentence.”  

Continue reading
  130 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

130 Hits

Ofatumumab Under Review for Relapsing Forms of Multiple Sclerosis - Monthly Prescribing Reference

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for Priority Review the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for ofatumumab (Novartis) for the treatment of relapsing forms of Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) in adults.

The sBLA is supported by data from the phase 3 ASCLEPIOS I and II trials that compared the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab, a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, with teriflunomide, a pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor, in 1882 adult patients with RMS. Patients were randomized to receive ofatumumab 20mg subcutaneously once monthly or oral teriflunomide 14mg once daily. The primary end point of both studies was annualized relapse rate (ARR) in patients treated for up to 30 months.

Results showed that ofatumumab significantly reduced ARR by 50.5% and 58.8% in ASCLEPIOS I and II when compared with teriflunomide (ARR=0.11 and 0.10 vs 0.22 and 0.25, P <.001), respectively. Ofatumumab also demonstrated significant suppression of both Gd+ T1 lesions and new or enlarging T2 lesions. Moreover, a relative risk reduction of 34.4% (P=.002) in 3-month confirmed disability progression (CDP) and 32.5% (P=.012) in 6-month CDP were observed in ofatumumab-treated patients when compared with teriflunomide. 

With regard to safety, ofatumumab demonstrated a favorable profile consistent with that seen in previous studies.

Related Articles

“We are very pleased that subcutaneous ofatumumab has moved closer to potential approval for patients with relapsing Multiple Sclerosis in both the US and in Europe. We hope that the priority review will mean that patients in the US will have access to this treatment option earlier in 2020,” said Jan van de Winkel, PhD, CEO of Genmab.

Continue reading
  102 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

102 Hits

Worldwide Genomics Markets, 2020-2027 - Comprehensive Analysis on the $31.1 Billion-Projected Industry - P&T Community

DUBLIN, Feb. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The "Genomics Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report by Application and Technology (Functional Genomics, Pathway Analysis), by Deliverables (Products, Services), by End Use, by Region, and Segment Forecasts, 2020 - 2027" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The global genomics market is expected to reach USD 31.1 billion by 2027, registering a CAGR of 7.7% over the forecast period according to this report. Significant changes in disease management processes along with advancements in genomics and personalized medicine are expected to propel the market.

Increasing pool of market innovators such as 23andMe, Oxford Nanopore Technologies, and Veritas Genetics that have launched breakthrough genomic technologies in recent years are also contributing toward market development. 23andMe has expertise in developing direct-to-consumer genomic tests targeted toward disease prognosis and has recently received FDA approval for its commercialization.

MinION - a trademark sequencing device of Oxford Nanopore Technologies, is witnessing significant traction owing to its ability to sequence any fragment length of DNA in real time. On the other hand, Veritas Genetics offers an affordable solution for a complete readout of the genomic sequence. Earlier procured only by doctors, these tests can now be taken by anyone curious about their DNA and costs approximately USD 1,000. The company has also begun the commercialization of this technique for newborn's genomic sequencing applications in China in 2017.

Further key findings from the report suggest:

Continue reading
  126 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

126 Hits

Cellular metabolism regulates the fate decision between pathogenic and regulatory T cells: Manipulating cellular metabolism may provide a promising therapeutic intervention in autoimmune diseases - Science Daily

Patients with autoimmune diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis have an imbalance between two types of immune system T cells. Destructive Th17 cells that mediate chronic inflammation are elevated, and regulatory T cells, or Treg cells, which suppress inflammatory responses and play a protective role in autoimmune disorders, are diminished.

Both cells differentiate from the same precursors -- naïve CD4 T cells -- and the beginning of their change to either Th17 or Treg cells starts with the same signal. Subsequently, a fate decision occurs, like a fork in the road, steering the changing CD4 cells to become either inflammatory T cells or regulatory T cells.

New, preclinical research, led by Laurie Harrington, Ph.D., associate professor in the UAB Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, shows a pivotal role for cellular metabolism to regulate that fate decision, a decision that occurs very early in the activation of CD4 T cells. This opens a possibility that manipulating the cellular metabolism of T cells may provide a new, promising therapeutic intervention to modulate the balance between pathogenic Th17 and Treg cells in chronic autoimmune disorders. The research is published in the journal Cell Reports.

Upon activation, T cells were known to rapidly increase metabolism, including glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, or OXPHOS, to meet the energetic demands of differentiation. But the precise contribution of OXPHOS to that Th17 differentiation was not defined.

The UAB researchers, and one colleague at New York University, found that ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration during Th17 differentiation was essential to upregulate glycolysis and the TCA cycle metabolism. Strikingly, it also was essential to promote inflammation of the central nervous system by Th17, as shown in a mouse model for Multiple Sclerosis.

Continue reading
  79 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

79 Hits

Dialectic Therapeutics Receives $3 Million Seed Award for Product Development Research from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas - P&T Community

DALLAS, Feb. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Dialectic Therapeutics, Inc., a Texas-based biotechnology company focused on creating innovative new technologies to end cancer, today announced it has received a $3 million Seed Award for Product Development Research from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).

Dialectic will use the funding from the CPRIT Seed Award to further the development of its lead product candidate, DT2216, a unique compound built using its proprietary and novel Antiapoptotic Protein Targeted Degradation (APTaD™) technology. In pre-clinical studies, DT2216 selectively induces cancer cells to degrade B-cell lymphoma extra large, or BCL-XL, stimulating the cells to commit suicide or become more susceptible to chemotherapy. DT2216 is currently in the IND-enabling phase for use as a single agent or as part of a combination therapy in hematologic cancers.

"We are honored and delighted to have received this Seed Award from CPRIT and the state of Texas, and it significantly advances our effort to develop novel drug candidates that address a significant need in cancer treatment. This grant will give us the opportunity to reach clinical relevance faster," said Dr. David Genecov, Dialectic's President and Chief Executive Officer. "The CPRIT funding will support continued development of our lead candidate, DT2216, which we believe may be a first-in-class anticancer agent targeting BCL-XL, the most commonly over-expressed antiapoptotic protein in cancer."

About Dialectic Therapeutics
Dialectic Therapeutics is a biotechnology company focused on creating innovative new technologies to end cancer. Our goal is to relieve the suffering of patients with cancer and prolong their productive lives through targeted therapies with limited toxicities and complications. Based in Dallas, TX, Dialectic Therapeutics has research partners and facilities at UT Health San Antonio and University of Florida Health.  Biotech venture investors John D. Harkey, Jr. and Dr. David Genecov capitalized the Company in 2018 and are co-founders along with Dr. Robert Hromas, Dean of the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio, Dr. Daohong Zhou at University of Florida Health Cancer Center, and Dr. Guangrong Zheng at University of Florida College of Pharmacy.

For more information regarding Dialectic Therapeutics, please visit www.dtsciences.com.

Continue reading
  131 Hits

Copyright

© news.google.com

131 Hits
 
 

Follow Us on Twitter

Follow Us On Twitter - Image