Condemnation, sympathy after man helps wife kill herself - Los Angeles Times

“Are you sure you want to die?”

Ángel Hernández stared at his wife through clear glasses. His face was pallid, haggard, his lip quivering.

María José Carrasco, 61, and eight years his junior, drooped in a squeaky red armchair. Her body was limp, her face sunken, and her mouth sagged into a scowl. But Carrasco wasn’t angry; she was nervous, uneasy even. Uneasy and in pain. She had endured Multiple Sclerosis for 30 years, and it was ravaging her body.

“Would you like it if we do it tomorrow?” Hernández said, glancing into the camera recording it all.

“Yes.”

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Retired Greenock priest has passed away after a long battle against multiple sclerosis - Glasgow Times

 

By Lorraine Tinney Reporter

Father Michale Clarke(SAC)

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Coronavirus flares as states and countries ease social distancing guidelines - The Washington Post

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Irishwoman who could barely walk due to multiple sclerosis now swimming daily - Irish Mirror

Irishwoman who could barely walk due to multiple sclerosis now swimming daily  Irish Mirror
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Coronavirus: Filling different roles keeps nursing skills sharp - Daytona Beach News-Journal

Editor’s note: The following story is part of a series honoring local nurses during National Nurses Week. Read more here.

Wherever Halifax Health is shorthanded, MaryJo Redd is ready to roll up her sleeves.

A nurse in the Centralized Staffing Office, Redd bounces between the pediatrics, intensive care unit and medical/surgical wings of the main hospital in Daytona Beach or, occasionally, the branch in Port Orange.

Shifting responsibilities keeps her sharp in times in crisis, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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We Ignore Ethical Problems With Surrogacy at Our Own Peril | Opinion - Newsweek

The recent announcement by popular television Anderson Cooper that he will be co-parenting via surrogacy a baby boy, Wyatt, elicited nearly universal congratulations. What could be happier than the birth of a child?

The happy announcement, however, blurs some difficult questions about a largely unregulated surrogacy industry that critics say puts women's health at risk and leads to the commodification of children. A plethora of ethical questions accompanies the birth of the child. But since most Americans seem to view both in vitro fertilization (IVF) and surrogacy as unalloyed goods, those questions are often not discussed—or even raised.

But they are important questions. We as a society ought to feel comfortable candidly discussing them.

First, surrogacy usually involves mystery. Who is the child's father? Who is the child's mother? Even if we know who provided the sperm, we still do not know who provided the other half of a surrogate child's genetic make-up: the surrogate who carried him or another woman who was paid to deliver eggs? And that's "eggs," in the plural, because surrogacy requires IVF—which, in turn, requires the manipulation of multiple eggs and sperm until a sufficient number of embryos are produced so as to increase the likelihood of uterine implantation.

Women generally produce only one egg at a time, once a month. But this biological reality makes for an inefficient supply chain-to-market process, so industry leaders tend to rely upon hyper-ovulation, in which a woman's reproductive system is prodded into producing upwards of a dozen eggs at one time. This is a painful and sometimes dangerous process. Jennifer Lahl, former nurse and outspoken critic of surrogacy, says the documented risks include loss of fertility, ovarian torsion, blood clots, kidney disease, premature menopause, ovarian cysts, chronic pelvic pain, stroke, reproductive cancers and, in some cases, death.

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Trials and Tribulations: Neurology Research During COVID-19 - Medscape

With some pivotal trials on hold, the COVID-19 pandemic is slowing the pace of research in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS).

However, researchers remain determined to forge ahead — with many redesigning their studies, at least in part to optimize the safety of their participants and research staff.

Keeping people engaged while protocols are on hold; expanding normal safety considerations; and re-enlisting statisticians to keep their findings as significant as possible are just some of study survival strategies underway.

Alzheimer's disease Research on Hold

The pandemic is having a significant impact on Alzheimer's research, and medical research in general, says Heather Snyder, PhD, vice president, Medical & Scientific Relations at the Alzheimer's Association.

"Many clinical trials worldwide are pausing, changing, or halting the testing of the drug or the intervention," she told Medscape Medical News. "How the teams have adapted depends on the study," she added. "As you can imagine, things are changing on a daily basis."

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Readers React: We need to lower prescription drug costs - Morning Call

Readers React: We need to lower prescription drug costs  Morning Call
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5 Technological Innovations Changing Medical Practice - Entrepreneur

April 29, 2020 5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

With , the past decade has been a revelation. developers are breaking new ground, doing what we once thought was impossible. For engineers, researchers and developers, it seems the question to ask now is not if it can be done but how. 

Virtually every sector of the economy is experiencing the refreshing impact of technological . Particularly in the sector, there are plenty of business opportunities for savvy entrepreneurs and investors. Here are some of the hottest areas of the industry. 

1. Robot-assisted surgery

This is often a mix of a sophisticated robotic surgical system and the special skills of highly trained surgeons. It is usually adopted for minimally invasive surgery. That is, where tiny incisions are made within the body and a laparoscopic machine inserted into the opening. The machine includes a high resolution camera, which captures the insides of the patient in 3D and guides the movements of the surgeon. The photographs from the camera are then magnified to permit the surgeon make elaborate movements in tiny spaces.

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COVID-19 and Neuromyelitis Optica Disorder: A Need for Guidance-Based Management - Neurology Advisor

As the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to unfold and healthcare workers scramble to meet demands of affected patients, little guidance has been issued on how to manage patients with COVID-19 and coexisting neurological disorders.

In a recent paper in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, neuroscience and infectious disease experts from the University of Buenos Aires suggest neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and the immunosuppressant therapies used to treat it, may present an additional challenge in the management of patients with COVID-19.

There is currently no evidence that NMOSD, a chronic brain and spinal cord disorder characterized by inflammation of the optic nerve and spinal cord, increases the risk of COVID-19 infection. In addition, no evidence exists to link COVID-19 to an increased risk of NMOSD relapse, despite that infections can trigger relapses in some patients. Regardless, long-term relapse prevention therapy for aquaporin-4 (AQP4-ab)-positive and -negative patients with NMOSD is still recommended. Monoclonal antibodies, including eculizumab, inebilizumab, rituximab, and satralizumab, may support prevention.

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In their paper, the authors from the University of Buenos Aires wrote that there is also no evidence to suggest clinicians halt immunosuppressant treatment in patients with NMOSD who have been infected by COVID-19. Also, no consensus statement has been issued on the management of patients with NMOSD and COVID-19 who are treated with immunosuppressant therapy. This lack of guidance indicates the need for more rigorous observational study in these patients to determine an appropriate management strategy.

The authors wrote that additional information gleaned from this research “will be crucial for patients and clinicians to make evidence-based decisions on how we should manage their disease during the pandemic, or in case of acquiring COVID-19.”

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NMSU graduate lands job analyzing data for HIV/AIDS research - Las Cruces Sun-News

Carlos Andres López, New Mexico State University Published 10:29 a.m. MT April 18, 2020

Susie Valenzuela, a two-time graduate of New Mexico State University, is now working as a research consultant/statistician for the University of Washington/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research. Valenzuela most recently graduated from NMSU in December 2019 with a master’s degree in applied statistics. (Photo: Courtesy photo / New Mexico State University)

LAS CRUCES - Susie Valenzuela’s knack for crunching numbers has taken her from New Mexico State University all the way to the University of Washington, where she recently launched her career as a statistician working to advance the prevention, detection and treatment of HIV infection and AIDS.

Valenzuela earned two degrees from NMSU, including a master’s degree in applied statistics in December 2019, before relocating to Seattle in March to join the University of Washington/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research, one of 19 research centers in the United States funded by the National Institutes of Health to support multidisciplinary research aimed at reducing the burden of HIV nationally and globally.

“My first day on the job was March 16th, and it’s just been an amazing experience so far, despite everything going on right now,” said Valenzuela, a first-generation college student who grew up in the rural southern New Mexico community of Chaparral and briefly lived on the island of Maui in Hawaii after high school.

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Sherman Mather Henry - Obituaries - Cape Cod Times

 

SOUTH YARMOUTH - Sherman Mather Henry of South Yarmouth, MA died at Cape Cod Hospital April 12, 2020 at the age of 81.

Sherman was born in North Adams, MA and was a graduate from Drury High School N. Adams class of 56, University of Massachusetts Amherst class of 60 with a BS in mechanical engineering where he belonged to Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity. He also attended RPI in Troy NY.

After college he went to work at Sprague Electric in North Adams. In 1961 he started work at Waterbury Farrel, Cleveland Hobbing division in Cheshire Ct. where he was an applications engineer.

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Judge halts sale of bleach marketed as coronavirus treatment - WSVN 7News | Miami News, Weather, Sports | Fort Lauderdale

MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge in South Florida has ordered a Colombia-based church to stop selling an industrial bleach marketed as a treatment for the new coronavirus and other ailments.

Judge Kathleen Williams entered a temporary injunction Friday halting Genesis II Church of Health and Healing’s sale of Miracle Mineral Solution in the U.S.

Genesis sells MMS through its websites, according to a U.S. Justice Department civil complaint filed Thursday in the Southern District of Florida. Prosecutors say Genesis markets the solution as a treatment for COVID-19, as well as Alzheimer’s, autism, brain cancer, HIV/AIDS and Multiple Sclerosis. The Food and Drug Administration has previously issued public warnings that MMS can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and severe dehydration. The chemical product, chlorine dioxide, becomes a powerful bleach when combined with the included activator, officials said.

“We will zealously pursue perpetrators of fraud schemes seeking to take advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic,” U.S. Attorney Ariana Fajardo Orshan said in a statement.

disease-related treatment claims for MMS are unsupported by any well-controlled clinical studies or other credible scientific substantiation, according to the complaint.

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Better Buy: GlaxoSmithKline vs. Bristol Myers Squibb - Motley Fool

If you're hunting for great stocks to buy while the market is still down, you'll definitely want to check out big pharma stocks. Many large drugmakers have strong financial positions. Nearly all of them market products that people will need, regardless of what happens at the macroeconomic level.

GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK) and Bristol Myers Squibb (NYSE:BMY) rank as two of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Both stocks are also down from their highs set earlier this year by double-digit percentages. Which pharma stock is the better buy? Here's how GSK and BMS compare.

Image source: Getty Images.

The case for GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline is a company in transition. Over the short run, this transition is likely to be choppy. For example, GSK expects to post a net loss in 2020 as it prepares to split into two companies, one focused on consumer health and the other on pharmaceuticals and vaccines. But over the long term, GSK could be positioned for success.

The company claims several relatively new drugs on the market that should drive growth for years to come. Sales for respiratory drug Trelegy Ellipta are skyrocketing. HIV drugs Juluca and Dovato are picking up tremendous momentum. Ovarian cancer drug Zejula is another rising star.

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No One Is Supporting the Doctors - The Atlantic

Health-care systems in America do not support physicians and do not support the most vulnerable patients. Physicians are seen as upwardly mobile and willing to pay the price of unacceptably low residency pay and backbreaking work in order to do what they love. Patients without access to care are seen as unambiguous—they lack insurance because they do not work. Hopefully this crisis opens the eyes of Americans to the plight of both groups.

The White House, the Centers for disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Health, the National Institutes of Health—they all failed to deliver on sufficient testing, on guidelines, on coherent messaging. Hospitals across New York City failed to report health-care-worker fatality rates or to produce ventilation-eligibility criteria, leaving me to guess at my own risk and to decide who lives and dies. There has been an abdication of leadership at the highest levels of this crisis that has trickled down to me, a physician in an ER with inadequate personal protections telling oxygen-starved patients to come back when they cannot speak a full sentence or are coughing up more than one tablespoon of blood. These institutions, just like my attendings, are teaching me a lesson through absence: how to manage a pandemic alone. And I am ready because I have been left alone before.

“Sink or swim” seems to be the mantra of medical training. The second year of my residency was physically taxing, with eight or nine 12-hour overnight shifts in a row. I frequently had to flip my sleep schedule to wake up at 6 a.m. or 5 p.m., depending on the day. The physical rigor of residency left me moody, weary, stretched thin. And yet that was only the beginning of the process. On top of the physical exhaustion, residency pushes new physicians to extreme autonomy.

My attendings could have easily lightened my patient load, but they did not, so that I could learn self-sufficiency. They could have acknowledged the particular challenges I faced later as a black physician at NYU Medical Center, treating upper-class white patients who sometimes doubted that I was even a doctor. But they did not, so I could learn resilience. They could have counseled me on how to process the immense human suffering of Bellevue. Instead they mostly did not, leaving me to internalize my agony, and see the next patient. Their effective absence—only there as a malpractice safety net—taught me how to work efficiently, to manage an entire team of caregivers in the emergency department, and eventually to manage the ugliest parts of myself and others.

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World Animal Protection calls on WHO for global ban of wildlife markets to save human lives - P&T Community

NEW YORK, April 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, World Health Day, over 200 organizations from across the world, including World Animal Protection, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Humane Society International, Born Free, and Wild Aid, have issued a letter urging the World Health Organization (WHO) to endorse a permanent ban on live wildlife markets and the use of wildlife in traditional medicine.

The letter highlights that with the suspected COVID-19 link to a wildlife market in China, WHO must take action to achieve its mission to serve public health at all times. WHO should recommend that governments worldwide permanently ban live wildlife markets and the use of wildlife in traditional medicine.

These actions would help protect human life from future pandemics such as COVID-19. Sixty percent of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, meaning they originate from animals, and 70% of these are believed to originate in wild animals.  

The letter states: "While a robust global response is critical in detecting, treating and reducing transmission [of COVID-19], it is equally necessary to take vital measures to prevent similar emerging infectious diseases developing into pandemics with the associated threats to human life, and social and economic well-being." 

A ban on wildlife markets is urgently needed to prevent the unregulated and unhygienic conditions and the close proximity between humans and animals, providing the perfect opportunity for pathogens to spread.

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Muir scion helps bring 'access' to Suisun Marsh setting - Fairfield Daily Republic

SUISUN CITY — Michael Muir has not let a diagnoses of Multiple Sclerosis stop him from enjoying the outdoors, even if it is from his wheelchair.

The 68-year-old’s love of horses keeps him ticking along just fine. Over the past 55 years, he has represented the United States four times in world and international championship carriage driving competitions, winning medals and championship honors in Germany, Austria, France and Great Britain.

He also founded Access Adventure in 2005, enriching the lives of people with disabilities, injured veterans, at-risk youth, senior citizens and children with special needs. His program provides the opportunity for therapy through educational, outdoor activities.

The program also provides people with disabilities of all ages the opportunity to ride and learn about recreational carriage driving and therapeutic driving. Access Adventure provides youth programs and specialized educational opportunities relating to preservation, ecology, wildlife habitat and rangeland management.

His work doesn’t stop there. He breeds the Stonewall Sporthorses at Rush Ranch headquarters on Grizzly Island Road, which has created a livelihood for him and an adventure far beyond what he could have dreamed.

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Bristol Myers Squibb Receives Positive CHMP Opinion Recommending Approval of ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Active Disease | Small Molecules | News Channels - PipelineReview.com

Bristol Myers Squibb Receives Positive CHMP Opinion Recommending Approval of ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis with Active disease

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PRINCETON, NJ, USA I March 27, 2020 IBristol Myers Squibb (NYSE:BMY) today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a positive opinion for ZEPOSIA® (ozanimod) for the treatment of adult patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) with active disease as defined by clinical or imaging features. ZEPOSIA is an oral, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator that binds with high affinity selectively to S1P subtypes 1 (S1P1) and 5 (S1P5). The CHMP recommendation will now be reviewed by the European Commission, which has the authority to approve medicines for the European Union.

“This positive CHMP opinion reinforces that ZEPOSIA has the potential to become an important treatment option for patients with Relapsing Remitting MS with active disease. There remains a need for effective and safe therapies that impact both the relapses and brain lesions that are characteristic of this disease,” said Samit Hirawat, M.D., chief medical officer, Bristol Myers Squibb. “We look forward to the European Commission’s decision and the potential to bring ZEPOSIA to patients in the EU.”

The CHMP adopted the positive opinion based on data from the randomized, active-controlled Phase 3 SUNBEAM™ and RADIANCE™ Part B clinical trials, which enrolled more than 2,600 patients across 150 sites in more than 20 countries. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ZEPOSIA for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) on March 25, 2020.

About SUNBEAM™

SUNBEAM is a pivotal, phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy, safety and tolerability of two doses of oral ZEPOSIA (0.92 mg and 0.46 mg, equivalent to 1 mg and 0.5 mg ozanimod HCI, respectively) against weekly intramuscular AVONEX® (interferon beta-1a) for at least a 12-month treatment period. The study included 1,346 people living with RMS across 152 sites in 20 countries.

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Novartis CEO: Malaria drug is biggest hope against coronavirus - SonntagsZeitung - Reuters

ZURICH, March 29 (Reuters) - Novartis Chief Executive Vas Narasimhan said his Sandoz generics unit’s malaria, lupus and arthritis drug hydroxychloroquine is the company’s biggest hope against the coronavirus, Swiss newspaper SonntagsZeitung reported on Sunday.

Novartis has pledged to donate 130 million doses and is supporting clinical trials needed before the medicine, which U.S. President Donald Trump also has been promoting, can be approved for use against the coronavirus.

Other companies including Bayer and Teva have also agreed to donate hydroxychloroquine or similar drugs, while Gilead Sciences is testing its experimental drug remdesivir against coronavirus.

“Pre-clinical studies in animals as well as the first data from clinical studies show that hydroxychloroquine kills the coronavirus,” Narasimhan told the newspaper. “We’re working with Swiss hospitals on possible treatment protocols for the clinical use of the drug, but it’s too early to say anything definitively.”

He said the company is currently looking for additional active drug ingredients to make more hydroxychloroquine, should clinical trials be successful.

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Ronald Eugene Cheatham - San Marcos Daily Record

As a public service, public health stories are free to Central Texans during the coronavirus crisis. Please support our local journalists by subscribing today. Call 512-392-2458.

Interested in submitting an obituary? Learn how to do so by clicking here.

Sun, 03/29/2020 - 12:00am

Born: June 24th, 1951 San Marcos, TX

Died: March 20th, 2020 Austin, TX

Attended Dunbar School, Graduate of San Marcos High School Attended New Mexico Highlands University

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