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Plant Based Diet study shows NO significant improvement on brain MRI, relapse rate or disability as assessed by EDSS scores in subjects with RRMS over one year

Plant Based Diet study shows NO significant improvement on brain MRI, relapse rate or disability as assessed by EDSS scores in subjects with RRMS over one year

Low-fat, plant-based diet in Multiple Sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role that dietary interventions can play in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) management is of huge interest amongst patients and researchers but data evaluating this is limited. Possible effects of a very-low-fat, plant-based dietary intervention on MS related progression and disease activity as measured by brain imaging and MS related symptoms have not been evaluated in a randomized-controlled trial. Despite use of disease modifying therapies (DMT), poor quality of life (QOL) in MS patients can be a significant problem with fatigue being one of the common disabling symptoms. Effective treatment options for fatigue remain limited. Emerging evidence suggests diet and vascular risk factors including obesity and hyperlipidemia may influence MS disease progression and improve QOL.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate adherence, safety and effects of a very-low-fat, plant-based diet (Diet) on brain MRI, clinical [MS relapses and disability, body mass index (BMI)] and metabolic (blood lipids and insulin) outcomes, QOL [Short Form-36 (SF-36)], and fatigue [Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS)], in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS).

METHODS:

This was a randomized-controlled, assessor-blinded, one-year long study with 61 participants assigned to either Diet (N=32) or wait-listed (Control, N=29) group.

RESULTS:

The mean age (years) [Control-40.9±8.48; Diet-40.8±8.86] and the mean disease duration (years) [Control -5.3±3.86; Diet-5.33±3.63] were comparable between the two groups. There was a slight difference between the two study groups in the baseline mean expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score [Control-2.22±0.90; Diet-2.72±1.05]. Eight subjects withdrew (Diet, N=6; Control, N=2). Adherence to the study diet based on monthly Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was excellent with the diet group showing significant difference in the total fat caloric intake compared to the control group [total fat intake/total calories averaged ~15% (Diet) versus ~40% (Control)]. The two groups showed no differences in brain MRI outcomes, number of MS relapses or disability at 12 months. The diet group showed improvements at six months in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Δ=-11.99mg/dL; p=0.031), total cholesterol (Δ=-13.18mg/dL; p=0.027) and insulin (Δ=-2.82mg/dL; p=0.0067), mean monthly reductions in BMI (Rate=-1.125kg/m2 per month; p
(Originally posted by Stuart)
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Ketogenic diet and fasting diet as Nutritional Approaches in Multiple Sclerosis (NAMS): protocol of a randomized controlled study

Ketogenic diet and fasting diet as Nutritional Approaches in Multiple Sclerosis (NAMS): protocol of a randomized controlled study

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in young adults that may lead to progressive disability. Since pharmacological treatments may have substantial side effects, there is a need for complementary treatment options such as specific dietary approaches. Ketone bodies that are produced during fasting diets (FDs) and ketogenic diets (KDs) are an alternative and presumably more efficient energy source for the brain. Studies on mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis showed beneficial effects of KDs and FDs on disease progression, disability, cognition and inflammatory markers. However, clinical evidence on these diets is scarce. In the clinical study protocol presented here, we investigate whether a KD and a FD are superior to a standard diet (SD) in terms of therapeutic effects and disease progression.

METHODS:

This study is a single-center, randomized, controlled, parallel-group study. One hundred and eleven patients with relapsing-remitting MS with current disease activity and Stable immunomodulatory therapy or no disease-modifying therapy will be randomized to one of three 18-month dietary interventions: a KD with a restricted carbohydrate intake of 20-40 g/day; a FD with a 7-day fast every 6 months and 14-h daily intermittent fasting in between; and a fat-modified SD as recommended by the German Nutrition Society. The primary outcome measure is the number of new T2-weighted MRI lesions after 18 months. Secondary endpoints are safety, changes in relapse rate, disability progression, fatigue, depression, cognition, quality of life, changes of gut microbiome as well as markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and autophagy. Safety and feasibility will also be assessed.

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DISCUSSION:

Preclinical data suggest that a KD and a FD may modulate immunity, reduce disease severity and promote remyelination in the mouse model of MS. However, clinical evidence is lacking. This study is the first clinical study investigating the effects of a KD and a FD on disease progression of MS.

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(Originally posted by Stuart)
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54 Hits

Can a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis be made without ruling out neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder ?

Can a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis be made without ruling out neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder ?

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can overlap with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Although testing is available for aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies, screening for NMOSD is recommended but not mandatory to establish a diagnosis of MS.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We queried 319,994 individuals who filed claims for MS and NMOSD in a Truven Health Analytics (THA) database and had at least one year of uninterrupted health insurance coverage. Of this cohort, 2001 (0.62%) were diagnosed as having NMOSD after an initial diagnosis of MS, based on ICD 9/10 codes. Since THA only offers claims-based data, we initiated an individual patient-based data search at our medical center to screen for potential misdiagnoses. We identified 4/54 (7.4%) NMOSD cases that were initially diagnosed as having MS.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results from our small study have significant implications--symptoms, clinical presentation or classic radiological findings perhaps cannot reliably separate MS from NMOSD. If our study findings can be replicated, guidelines to diagnose MS ought to recommend that NMOSD be excluded first despite typical clinical and radiological findings pointing to MS.

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This Article is Provided by:  #MSViewsandNews
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(Originally posted by Stuart)
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104 Hits